Now THAT is a workbench.

For general talk non car related.
Tasteful jokes.
User avatar

Topic author
abowie
Posts: 2363
Joined: Wed Sep 07, 2011 9:15 pm
Location: Australia
Contact:
Australia

#1 Now THAT is a workbench.

Post by abowie » Tue Sep 10, 2019 7:10 am

Spent the weekend renovating my Grandpa's old workbench. He built it in the mid 1930's out of slotted angle iron and it was held together with Whitworth hardware.

Trued it up, welded in some supports for a toolbox and a few storage crates, a coat of paint and a shiny new galvanised top.

I plan to mount my new mill on it.


Image
Andrew.
881824, 1E21538. 889457..oops
http://www.projectetype.com/index.php/the-blog.html
Adelaide, Australia

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar

malcolm
Posts: 1509
Joined: Fri Jan 03, 2014 10:44 am
Location: Fleet
Great Britain

#2 Re: Now THAT is a workbench.

Post by malcolm » Tue Sep 10, 2019 7:24 am

Very smart!
Malcolm
I only fit in a 2+2, so got one!
1969 Series 2 2+2
2009 Jaguar XF-S

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links


christopher storey
Posts: 4539
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2008 3:07 pm
Location: cheshire , england
Great Britain

#3 Re: Now THAT is a workbench.

Post by christopher storey » Wed Sep 11, 2019 7:44 am

With all due respect, lovely though it is , that does not look anything like strong enough for a milling machine, which both for safety and accuracy require a really immobile fixing

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar

Series1 Stu
Posts: 920
Joined: Thu Feb 02, 2017 12:26 pm
Location: Shropshire
Great Britain

#4 Re: Now THAT is a workbench.

Post by Series1 Stu » Wed Sep 11, 2019 8:30 am

It rather depends what type of milling machine. Size and weight etc. If it's a small nodern high frequency machine then the reaction loads are relatively low and therefore you can get away with a less rigid mounting than the more conventional machines.

I would suggest that Andrew's bench would be more than adequate for some of the budget machines that are out there.

Regards
Stuart

If you can't make it work, make it complicated!

'62 FHC - Work In (slow) Progress
'69 Daimler 420 Sovereign
'94 X300 XJR basket case

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar

Topic author
abowie
Posts: 2363
Joined: Wed Sep 07, 2011 9:15 pm
Location: Australia
Contact:
Australia

#5 Re: Now THAT is a workbench.

Post by abowie » Wed Sep 11, 2019 9:57 am

Aha! The 1.5mm galv sheet covers a 40mm thick hardwood top. The frame is 1/8" slotted angle and I have reinforced it with 2" x 3" x 1/8" tube underneath. I have tack welded all of the angle pieces to reinforce the bolts.

I think it will probably do the job but if not I'll build a more robust stand for it. The mill weighs in at 300kg.

I was originally going to replace the top with a solid piece of 10mm steel plate but the top itself would have weighed 120kg and I would have struggled to get it into the back of my shed.
Andrew.
881824, 1E21538. 889457..oops
http://www.projectetype.com/index.php/the-blog.html
Adelaide, Australia

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links


tim wood
Posts: 579
Joined: Fri Nov 20, 2009 6:52 pm
Location: Leighton Buzzard UK
Great Britain

#6 Re: Now THAT is a workbench.

Post by tim wood » Wed Sep 11, 2019 4:12 pm

To paraphrase;
You can’t “judge a workbench by its cover”


Ok - I know it’s poor !
Series 1 FHC purchased 40 years ago when I was young. Sold
Series 1 2+2 when the kids were small now sold
Series 1.5 OTS in opalescent maroon, Californian car. My retirement present.

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar

Topic author
abowie
Posts: 2363
Joined: Wed Sep 07, 2011 9:15 pm
Location: Australia
Contact:
Australia

#7 Re: Now THAT is a workbench.

Post by abowie » Thu Sep 12, 2019 8:38 am

Progress.

3 axis DRO kit to install.
Image


X axis installed.
Image


X axis power feed installed.
Image

Next! Y axis DRO. This is the tricky one. Watch this space!
Andrew.
881824, 1E21538. 889457..oops
http://www.projectetype.com/index.php/the-blog.html
Adelaide, Australia

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links


christopher storey
Posts: 4539
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2008 3:07 pm
Location: cheshire , england
Great Britain

#8 Re: Now THAT is a workbench.

Post by christopher storey » Fri Sep 13, 2019 12:21 pm

Andrew , I really urge you not to do this, at least unless you run the scheme past a consulting engineer. I am really concerned as to what would happen if a sudden jam on the milling machine created substantial out of balance forces . My fear would be that such an event could cause the whole thing, machine and bench together, to spin round and/or to topple over. What does the bench weigh compared with the nearly 1/3 tonne of the machine ?

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar

Topic author
abowie
Posts: 2363
Joined: Wed Sep 07, 2011 9:15 pm
Location: Australia
Contact:
Australia

#9 Re: Now THAT is a workbench.

Post by abowie » Fri Sep 13, 2019 10:14 pm

The bench can just be moved by 2 strong men. So maybe 100kg?

This is a commercially available mill stand. It's made of 3mm steel and weighs 50kg. The slots in the bottom are for fitting adjustable feet to level it.

Image

What I have is bigger heavier and as rigid. I think it will be OK. I plan to bolt the mill down to it.

I have got a sniff of a 1600 by 800 piece of 25mm plate steel. If I can get my hands on it I'm going to put it on my other bench which is made out of pallet rack frame. It will weigh 250kg and I would weld some lifting eyes onto it to move it. It would make a good combination mill stand and welding table.
Andrew.
881824, 1E21538. 889457..oops
http://www.projectetype.com/index.php/the-blog.html
Adelaide, Australia

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

Post Reply Previous topicNext topic