Garage Flooring

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Kember17
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#41 Re: Garage Flooring

Post by Kember17 » Wed Jun 28, 2017 10:27 am

This suggestion might be over-engineering a bit but a few years ago I came across AltroCrete PU Fast-Track resin flooring while dealing with an upgrade to a fire station which had vehicles in an out all day for testing. I believe its use is fairly standard across UK fire services and the project manager told me it was excellent value for money and would last ten years in that heavy use environment.

I have no affiliation with Altro but it might be worth having a fossick around their website.

The other thing is that they (their contractors) are used to installing the flooring with a two or three inch lip up the wall to enable mopping/power washing and assist in keeping hospitals/nurseries/factories hygienic.

Website here: https://www.altro.co.uk/Blog-and-case-s ... re-Station

Malvern was not the station I saw but the fit and finish is similar.

It will be what I go for if/when I finally get planning permission for my extension.

Peter
Peter

1966 LHD US Import Series 1 2+2 (undergoing full restoration)

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Jaglex
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#42 Re: Garage Flooring

Post by Jaglex » Wed Jun 28, 2017 2:00 pm

Just a thought:
If cars are going in and out, epoxy may well be fine.
But if your car is standing on it for longer periods (winter layup) the epoxy floor might harm the tires.
Ser. 1.5 DHC LHD

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andrewh
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#43 Re: Garage Flooring

Post by andrewh » Wed Jun 28, 2017 6:31 pm

I spoke with the Epoxy paint technical department again today. They insisted that the concrete must be scarified to open the surface to accept a good bond. They made the comment that when you drive in with a car on warm tyres, they will transfer heat to the paint and if its not bonded to the substrate then when you drive out it will just pick up the paint. Since I really do NOT want to grind concrete in my garage, toy cupboard, showroom and build space.....I think I am back to the tiles again. Maybe its easier to just sell all the cars and buy a house in France with the money? Wont be raining there either if I go far enough south. :bigrin:
1962 3.8 Series One FHC

http://etype860897.blogspot.com/

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288gto
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#44 Re: Garage Flooring

Post by 288gto » Wed Jun 28, 2017 11:46 pm

Andrew, I have seen contractors using industrial surface grinders with vacuum dust extraction. The problem will probably be cost.


http://nationwidediamondgroup.co.uk/concrete-grinding/

Simon
Simon
1969 S2 OTS

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Polse7317
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#45 Re: Garage Flooring

Post by Polse7317 » Thu Jun 29, 2017 7:35 am

Before époxy paint, i have put a primer coat which allow a good bonding surface for the Epoxy resin
Yves, happy XKE 63 fhc , w113 280sl owner
Looking for a OTS 4.2 serie 1....! :scratchheadyellow: and now have found a fhc xk 140 :lol:

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Series1 Stu
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#46 Re: Garage Flooring

Post by Series1 Stu » Thu Jun 29, 2017 2:03 pm

Hi

You can hire the grinder and vacuum extraction for a couple of hundred pounds a week. I did my 100 sq m garage in a day or so and I had a lot of levelling to do. Of course, you need to buy the grinding blocks too.

Finished it with epoxy 2 pack applied by roller.

It could do with being painted again but it is 12 years or so since it was done.

Regards
Stuart

If you can't make it work, make it complicated!

'62 FHC - Work In (slow) Progress
'69 Daimler 420 Sovereign
'94 X300 XJR basket case

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Doug Buchan
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#47 Re: Garage Flooring

Post by Doug Buchan » Sun Jul 09, 2017 2:35 am

Andrew,
Over here, we just power wash after applying a de greasing agent. Then let it dry and etch with muriatic acid . Power wash again and let dry thoroughly then apply 2 part solid color epoxy. I've done this a couple of times and it works well.
Doug
'67 ots

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oliver78
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#48 Re: Garage Flooring

Post by oliver78 » Tue Oct 24, 2017 10:06 am

After a lot of research, I decided to go with FlexiTiles PVC floor tiles that I got from a shop called Bricoflor. My garage floor was a bit cracked in parts and this was the easiest because you don´t need to repair your floor before installing it. So far they´ve held up really good.

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Bobb
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#49 Re: Garage Flooring

Post by Bobb » Tue Oct 24, 2017 8:36 pm

A garage for an old car deserves an old floor finish that's been proven over decades of use...
https://www.doityourself.com/stry/using ... or-sealant

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JagWaugh
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#50 Re: Garage Flooring

Post by JagWaugh » Wed Oct 25, 2017 7:12 am

Bobb wrote:A garage for an old car deserves an old floor finish that's been proven over decades of use...
https://www.doityourself.com/stry/using ... or-sealant
Interesting, I hadn't thought of that.
How well does it stand up to brake fluid, fuel etc? Do you have to recoat it?

I've used it to protect exposed wood (thinned highly and multiple applications), and it is common to use it as a "gloss refresh" on painted wood shutters here.

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Bobb
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#51 Re: Garage Flooring

Post by Bobb » Wed Oct 25, 2017 8:48 pm

JagWaugh wrote:
Bobb wrote:A garage for an old car deserves an old floor finish that's been proven over decades of use...
https://www.doityourself.com/stry/using ... or-sealant
Interesting, I hadn't thought of that.
How well does it stand up to brake fluid, fuel etc? Do you have to recoat it?

I've used it to protect exposed wood (thinned highly and multiple applications), and it is common to use it as a "gloss refresh" on painted wood shutters here.
It seems to stand up well although I don't really pay much attention. My garage floor is rarely seen as it's covered in tools, dropped parts, stuff, junk and a layer of kitty litter where my kitty 's engine is.
I also like the old world natural finishes on any wooden item. I'm making a wooden dash for my E-Type and have been experimenting with various finishes. So far I like Danish oil the best.

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nefematic
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#52 Re: Garage Flooring

Post by nefematic » Sat Oct 28, 2017 10:35 am

It really does not last well because when hot tyres get on it after a run, they tend to pick up the surface.

I recently installed a sliding garage door with glas panels for a friend, in his new garage. Talking with the professional coater he mentioned it is not possible to get a durable adhesion between concrete and the coating, and he denies doing any such job, if a car has been driven in even once! He claims it has to do with the tyre rubber losing softeners to the concrete which he chemically cannot remove :scratchheadyellow: I‘ve no idea if he‘s right but he sure did sound convincing.

Martin
Martin Scherz
Late S2 1970 OTS US LHD

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ralphr1780
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#53 Re: Garage Flooring

Post by ralphr1780 » Mon Oct 30, 2017 11:03 am

JagWaugh wrote:
Bobb wrote:A garage for an old car deserves an old floor finish that's been proven over decades of use...
https://www.doityourself.com/stry/using ... or-sealant
Interesting, I hadn't thought of that.
How well does it stand up to brake fluid, fuel etc? Do you have to recoat it?

I've used it to protect exposed wood (thinned highly and multiple applications), and it is common to use it as a "gloss refresh" on painted wood shutters here.
For good order sake and to avoid possibly misleading comments, being professionally involved in such segment quite a number of years and particularly with linseed oil usage and applications, here are some guiding comments from our tech expert colleague:
Indeed "Double Boiled Linseed Oil" (DBLO) is suitable for use a concrete floor sealant. But it is common knowledge that concrete is highly alkaline and linseed oil is susceptible to saponification under alkaline conditions.
Therefore before applying DBLO it is advisable to neutralize the concrete surface with fluate (fluosilicate).
Further more we'd like to inform you that DBLO is really boiled and siccative is added. We don't add any solvent. Once you add a solvent it becomes a reduced DBLO. Please have a look at this article from Wikipedia:
Double Boiled Linseed Oil
Raw Linseed oil is heated and air is blown to produce Double Boiled Linseed Oil. Heating the oil causes it to polymerize and oxidize, effectively making it thicker and shortening its drying time. It dries more completely and quickly and forms a film on the surface. Double Boiled Linseed Oil is a dark amber coloured oil having a distinctively smell. This oil is mainly used indoors. It is very water resistant, and also a rust inhibitor. It has a higher viscosity when compared to Raw Linseed oil.
Ralph
'69 OTS + '62 OTS - Belgium

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caveman
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#54 Re: Garage Flooring

Post by caveman » Mon Oct 30, 2017 2:01 pm

My garage is more of a show room now that my car has been restored.
I used B&Q large carpet tiles that came in numerous colours including Grey (mine) and Dark Green. They've been down for 10 years now and are still as good as the day I put them down. They are approx 5-7mm thick with rubberised backing. I secured them, wall to wall with no gaps, to a ply floor with industrial carpet tape and they dont move. Trolley jacks run with ease and with no indentation after use. I did melt one after a brief wheel spin getting the tyres into their tyre savers but I just replaced the one section at no cost as I had a few spares. I run a hoover over them when the car is outside and I've also scrubbed them clean after small spillages. My garage is heated and this was the best option for me to retain the heat and its more comfortable on the knees when working around the car, polishing etc.

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chrisfell
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#55 Re: Garage Flooring

Post by chrisfell » Mon Oct 30, 2017 2:44 pm

neil4444 wrote:£200 and still fine 5 years on.
Image
Sod the garage floor, You’ve got 2 J40s! Either of them race winners recently?
Chris '67 S1 2+2

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rswaffie
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#56 Re: Garage Flooring

Post by rswaffie » Tue Nov 28, 2017 4:19 pm

I went for a basic 50x50x12mm heavy duty recycled pvc checkerplate tile, from Duramat. Very pleased with the quality and they fitted very tightly together (rubber mallet helped) so there will be no movement. £260 delivered.

Image

Image
Richard

S1 3.8 FHC Opalescent Golden Sand 889504
Undergoing a comprehensive restoration in my small, but utilitarian garage :wrench: :hammer: :fingerscrossed:

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Fionaj
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#57 Re: Garage Flooring

Post by Fionaj » Tue Nov 20, 2018 1:38 pm

I had mine professionally epoxied last year and I absolutely love it. I have a standard 2-car garage and if I recall, paid something like $1,800 with a lifetime warranty. If anything happens, at all, they come out and take care of it. So far, it's still perfect. Just sweep it every couple months, swiffer it, and it looks like brand new. Everyone that sees it is wowed and there's no doubt it adds to the resale value.

I also installed a Gladiator storage system and between those two upgrades, the garage has truly become another nice, usable room of our home versus a place you want to get out of quickly as soon as you step out of your car.

There is one major downfall, however - it's as slippery as hell when it's wet. I've almost killed myself a handful of times. We're extremely careful now when walking on it after the cars have recently been brought in after a rain.

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PhilBell
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#58 Re: Garage Flooring

Post by PhilBell » Thu Dec 06, 2018 2:04 pm

Whenever I mention my long-held dream to deal with the dusty concrete floor in my garage to a fellow car nut and garage dweller, he always recommends PVA (poly vinyl adhesive), diluted 50:50 if I recall correctly. It soaks into the surface, seals it against dust, doesn't get picked up by tyres or trolley jacks etc and isn't slippery when wet.
He arrived at that after tiring of the limitations of garage floor paint. It's also very cheap.
I'll do it once I get to the end of the job list on my E-type...
Phil
1962 FHC 885626

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Heuer
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#59 Re: Garage Flooring

Post by Heuer » Thu Dec 06, 2018 2:56 pm

Yes, I had an epoxy paint and it was treacherous when wet to the point where I felt it was life threatening. I ended up covering the floor with the studded plastic tiles and they have been great. Be aware though that tyres leach the black dye added to natural rubber so you end up with black patches where the car has been standing and nothing will remove it. This applies to expoxy paint, tiles or pretty much anything else you use.
David Jones
S1 OTS OSB; S1 FHC ODB

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288gto
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#60 Re: Garage Flooring

Post by 288gto » Thu Dec 06, 2018 10:48 pm

Heuer wrote:
Thu Dec 06, 2018 2:56 pm
Yes, I had an epoxy paint and it was treacherous when wet to the point where I felt it was life threatening.

I had an epoxy floor and found the same David . That was a while ago and it has lasted really well, however when I re do it I will probably go for a “non slip” version which would effectively seem to be a two part epoxy with fine sand mixed into it.
I’ve seen this done on a commercial site recently and was quite impressed with it.

Simon
Simon
1969 S2 OTS

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