Best car cover?

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Kes
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#1 Best car cover?

Post by Kes » Tue Sep 06, 2011 9:36 am

Hi all,
With winter approaching i'm thinking of getting a decent cover for my series 2 OTS. It's garaged of course, but sometimes when it's very cold thawing ice from condensation will drip onto the car from the roof.
Any views on who makes best covers? There's such a bewildering array of stuff available on line.
Cheers,
Kes.
No problem is that great that it can't be run away from.
Regency Red 1969 Series 2 roadster.
Iris Blue 1962 MGB roadster

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christopher storey
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#2

Post by christopher storey » Tue Sep 06, 2011 4:54 pm

The best car cover is none at all unless you have a heated and dehumidified garage . All fabric covers, however breathable the material, harbour moisture , and this is one of the commonest causes of microblistering. If you want to cover it, I suppose that one of the ventilated carcoon type devices is the best, but they are a bit of a faff to use

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daverawle
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#3

Post by daverawle » Tue Sep 06, 2011 5:26 pm

I had a Carcoon and feel that the principle is flawed. It circulated the good Atlantic air here and by spring all the ali bits had white whiskers :(

This sounds a better proposition:
http://www.permabag.com/

Dave
1963 OTS

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PeterCrespin
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#4

Post by PeterCrespin » Thu Oct 20, 2011 10:38 am

SPAMMER.

Seems to happen quite a bit on this forum? Is there a security tweak that can be made here?
1E75339 UberLynx D-Type; 1R27190 70 FHC; 1E78478; 2001 Vanden Plas

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Heuer
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#5

Post by Heuer » Thu Oct 20, 2011 4:48 pm

Deleted!

We were plagued by Bot spammers some time ago so I implemented a new security system for all new registrations which involves differentiating cats from cars. Has worked really well with stopping the automatic systems but a human can persevere and register. They then have to wait for an email and activate their account. So the process is pretty long winded and takes much longer than it takes me to delete their message, delete their registration and ban their username and IP address. As a result we never get repeat offenders. I don't want to introduce any other security measures that will make it onerous for legitimate members to post. Just a case of Mark, Angus and myself being vigilant and hitting the delete button. But a PM is always useful if you spot something untoward (hidden URL in a signature or post for example) so we can take action. We seem to get one every couple of weeks so it is not that bad.
Last edited by Heuer on Sun Dec 04, 2011 12:39 pm, edited 2 times in total.
David Jones
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#6

Post by PeterCrespin » Thu Oct 20, 2011 8:36 pm

Fair enough. Thanks for your efforts, I know it's not a trifling responsibility.

Pete
1E75339 UberLynx D-Type; 1R27190 70 FHC; 1E78478; 2001 Vanden Plas

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Riv944
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#7

Post by Riv944 » Mon Nov 14, 2011 6:44 pm

This I find an interesting topic because I have a Healey 3000 which I've had for some three years now and the micro blistering is getting worse. It had none when I bought it. It came with a soft cover which I've used when the car stays in the garage. All I've seen on micro blistering discussions seems to suggest it's caused by bad prep when the paint was applied, no one has ever before mentioned keeping the car covered. Now I've got the E as well, I bought an indoor "breathable" cover but now I'm scared to use it.
How many people have suffered micro blistering that they think was due to keeping it covered. My garage is insulated but not heated nor de humidified.

Ian

The best car cover is none at all unless you have a heated and dehumidified garage . All fabric covers, however breathable the material, harbour moisture , and this is one of the commonest causes of microblistering. If you want to cover it, I suppose that one of the ventilated carcoon type devices is the best, but they are a bit of a faff to use
E type series 2 4.2 LHD, US spec with 3 SU carb and 2.88:1 diff conversion.

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bfeng
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#8 Car covers and microblistering

Post by bfeng » Sat Dec 03, 2011 9:04 pm

If you have a modern urethane type paint job that's been properly applied, a cover won't cause microblistering (the paint's practically impervious to moisture). My 2+2 has been kept under a heavy cotton cover for 7 years (cold barn, dehumidified only in the summer), and there isn't any microblistering. I do have a few small spots, but those are clearly due to inadequate preparation of the metal.

My xk has been kept under a light weight cotton/poly blend cover for 20 years (the last under my ownership), and no microblistering at all despite the fact that it's old fashioned acrylic lacquer paint with good bare metal prep.

John
John Feng

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christopher storey
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#9

Post by christopher storey » Sun Dec 04, 2011 9:30 am

I'm afraid. John, that your New England climate is quite different from that in the UK, which may be why you have not suffered. Here our climate is very damp, as I realised when American friends who visit complain that whilst their NY state is very cold in Winter, it is dry cold. Hence I stand by every word I said at the outset - covers in a damp climate produce microblistering unless there is effective dehumidification at work

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bfeng
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#10 Car covers

Post by bfeng » Sun Dec 04, 2011 1:11 pm

chris,
I could indeed be wrong. Do you see this blistering uniformly over the area where the cover touches the paint?

We all run dehumidifiers here but I don't see them used as consistently in the UK. I've also not had such problems living in Berkeley, CA (which has a long, wet, cold) season. Modern urethanes are, I thought, essentially waterproof, and that's been my experience spraying for thirty years. I will admit I have no experience where a cover is not waterproof and goes thru a wet/dry cycle daily. A good waterproof cover, in my experience should keep all condensation off the paint surface. IMHO, micro-blistering a few years after a new paint job is likely caused when the spray was done in cool, humid weather without adequate metal prep and industrial quality air drying gear.
John Feng

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#11

Post by christopher storey » Sun Dec 04, 2011 6:44 pm

Unfortunately I am suffering from it on a car which I bought recently ( Opalescent Golden Sand Mark 2) where it had been covered for years and years, and where the paintwork still looks to be in good order until you look at the roof very closely , when an absolutely uniform covering of very small pimples can be seen over the whole surface . One of the factors which makes our climate so pernicious, and which may not apply even in Ca, is that we often have a spell of perhaps 4 or 5 days of temperatures of perhaps 25 degs F, followed by a sudden rise to 45F which results in the cars being absolutely covered in sweat for a day or so . The more usual microblistering from poor refinishing is much more patchy , and much more obvious and deeper in extent , on my S2 E

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#12

Post by Riv944 » Sun Dec 04, 2011 7:29 pm

Hi Christopher and John
My reason for trying to continue this thread was to ascertain if anyone has actually suffered micro blistering as a result of leaving the car covered. My Healey 3000 has quite a bad case of the problem in several areas of the car both on the steel and aluminium panels though by no means all over the car. I have kept it in France in a dry, insulated though unheated garage each winter for the last three years since I bought it and covered with a soft fabric cover. It had no microblistering when I bought it and I first noticed it after leaving the car in hot sun on a rally. This winter I've moved it to another garage and, as a result of this thread, left it uncovered. In the garage it used occupy is the unblistered E type for which I had bought a cover but I've left it uncovered as well. I get back to France in April and will see they fared this winter. What type of dehumidifier do you use John, I've only seen the chemical block type in France/

Ian
E type series 2 4.2 LHD, US spec with 3 SU carb and 2.88:1 diff conversion.

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#13 Well, it seems clear

Post by bfeng » Thu Dec 08, 2011 12:53 am

Ian, if you want to err on the safe side, don't use a cover. I have to agree that we don't have weather similar to what Chris describes. We do get very humid mornings in the spring/fall, but not combined with those temp shifts.

As far as dehumidifiers, here in the USA there are many brands of portable dehumidifiers for about $200. Most have a removal capacity in the range of 15-20 liters of water a day, and the better ones have provision to prevent the coils from freezing up in cool weather. Mine is setup to drain directly to the outside via a 2 meter long hose. I have mine set to 60% relative humidity year round, but it mainly runs in the spring and summer.

My major problem is with animals as I live adjacent to a forest. The wild turkey are too big to sneak into the barn. The deer leave piles of small gifts that soil the tires and the mice will chew thru anything other than a steel door to get inside the barn in the fall.
John Feng

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#14

Post by frogeater » Thu Dec 08, 2011 3:18 pm

Hello Ian,
I made a quick research on google (I'm not an expert in research and in deshumidifiers also :) ) and i found that: (the french term is "d?shumidificateur")
http://www.airnaturel.com/deshumidifica ... itres.html
I don't know anything about that, but because it's an English firm, perhaps some persons of the forum could add some comments?

Concerning the subject, I use a carcover from classic additions since 3 years, for an austin healey 100 4, and I didn't notice any problem with it, even if they sell a dehumidifier as "ideal addition" of their car cover: http://www.classicadditions.com/dehumidifier-c-68.html
I must add that I have micro blistering under the tonneau cover which stay permanently on the car :wink: :oops:

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#15

Post by Riv944 » Fri Dec 09, 2011 4:43 am

Hi John
Thanks for the two links. I like the idea of the second unit because it is self draining. I spend European winters in my home in the southern hemisphere which means leaving the car for months so a unit which needs regular draining is of no use. I've left it this year in a dry but unsealed garage with a desicant dehumidifier and uncovered so I'll see when I return how its gone. I will probably invest in the self draining type for next winter.

Ian
E type series 2 4.2 LHD, US spec with 3 SU carb and 2.88:1 diff conversion.

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#16

Post by Malk » Fri Dec 09, 2011 6:22 am

Heuer wrote:Deleted!

We were plagued by Bot spammers some time ago so I implemented a new security system for all new registrations which involves differentiating cats from cars. Has worked really well with stopping the automatic systems but a human can persevere and register. They then have to wait for an email and activate their account. So the process is pretty long winded and takes much longer than it takes me to delete their message, delete their registration and ban their username and IP address. As a result we never get repeat offenders. I don't want to introduce any other security measures that will make it onerous for legitimate members to post. Just a case of Mark, Angus and myself being vigilant and hitting the delete button. But a PM is always useful if you spot something untoward (hidden URL in a signature or post for example) so we can take action. We seem to get one every couple of weeks so it is not that bad.
Very difficult task especially being spread worlwide. We just banned every other country except UK but they still get through, one every couple weeks is good! We got hit with hundreds daily....... Not easy keeping a platform such as this working efficiently!

M.
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#17

Post by Sjmmarsh » Wed Jun 05, 2013 8:56 am

I have an uninsulated lockup garage in the UK. When the wind is in the wrong direction some rain does get through the roof, but relatively minor. The main problem I have is dust, as the road outside the garage is not made up, so dirt is kicked up by passing cars and gets into the garage. I have no power in the garage.

Should I cover the car or not, and which cover type is best - an indoor one (which this thread says can cause micro pitting) or an outdoor type that will keep the water off?

All comments are welcome.

Steve

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johnaz
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#18 Re: Best car cover?

Post by johnaz » Mon Aug 26, 2019 10:28 pm

I have nice covers that are stretchy type thin fabric for indoors only. Do not hold moisture. Work well for dust.
Made by Coverking.
Made to fit each car specifically. Stuff into small bag easily that comes with them. And can get them in colors to go with car in basic colors.
John

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#19 Re: Best car cover?

Post by Darinmoore » Tue Feb 18, 2020 8:33 pm

Your car is a huge investment. You, therefore, have to put in some work and money into protecting it and ensuring that it can serve you for the most extended period. Excellent maintenance and care are equivalent to a more extended serving vehicle, and while there is a lot you can do to keep your car safe, the first and most crucial step is protecting it from the day to day harsh elements. i forund a website here you can chose best custom car covers, Thanks!

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#20 Re:Best Car Cover

Post by splosh » Tue Feb 18, 2020 11:56 pm

christopher storey wrote:
Tue Sep 06, 2011 4:54 pm
The best car cover is none at all unless you have a heated and dehumidified garage . All fabric covers, however breathable the material, harbour moisture , and this is one of the commonest causes of microblistering. If you want to cover it, I suppose that one of the ventilated carcoon type devices is the best, but they are a bit of a faff to use
Just noticed this thread. I feel from personal experience its worth mentioning that the first time I ever used a car cover caused a very costly job in rectifying the dreaded "micro blistering" of the covered cars paintwork.
After the very expensive paint strip and re-spray - never will I use a car cover again. Climate controlled garage is now a lot cheaper. Even the very professional firm I used for the re-spray said to never use a car cover.


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