FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Talk about the E-Type Series 1

Ian Howe
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#181

Post by Ian Howe » Mon Nov 16, 2015 8:30 am

Front Sub-Frame Assembly - Detail

The cars up until February 1962 have the bonnet hanging frame #C16942 - whilst later cars had #C20352. The attachment for the early cars has been documented elsewhere - and involved taking the brackets off the bonnet to withdraw the shafts of the bolt. On later cars, the bolts could be withdrawn without disturbing the brackets on the bonnet.
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Early Frame on the right:
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A little know fact is the early bonnet support frames had no additional strenghtening supports on the lower rear tubes. Many restorers of early cars have failed to replicate this on new bonnet support frames!

Early Frame without the Strengthening Brackets:
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Later Strengthening Brackets:
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Front Cross Member Assembly

The Front Cross Member Assembly (aka Picture Frame) did not change - however the marking of the VIN number was on the leading edge on early cars - not sure when this practise stopped. Again, many restored cars fail to replicate this accurately. Early VIN Position on Picture Frame:
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Later VIN Position on Picture Frame:
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Finally there are differences on the bonnet hanging brackets - the early brackets have a different profile at the end. Early Bracket with part number C16803 cast into it:
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Photo: Tom Haddock

Later Bracket with part number C19326 cast into it:
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Ian Howe
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#182

Post by Ian Howe » Mon Nov 16, 2015 8:01 pm

Rear Rope Seal

Went to see Dick Bradley who is overhauling a 62 3.8 engine for me that is suffering from a poor overhaul in the US! Several interesting bits of information gathered today - new to me anyway. Dick mentioned that most off the problems with the rear rope oil seal were caused by incorrect fitting. The Churchill tool below is used to push the seal into the groove on the housing - the tool is inserted into the rear bearing, liberally lubricated, then turned and pushed forcing the seal in. The seals do not need to be cut and need a uniform pressure to locate it successfully:
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Pistons

The pistons used early in production had semi-split skirts (due to the expansion of the piston material) and were manufactured by Brico. The pistons were graded F - K to suit variance on bore size! In those days the tolerance used was far less than today - hence the bore was checked, a size allocated then marked with the piston number. Later pistons had a solid skirt.

EARLY 3.8 PISTON 'H" FOR BORE 2 - PART NUMBER C13794/1:
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BRICO PISTON TOLERANCE CHART:
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Heuer
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#183

Post by Heuer » Tue Nov 17, 2015 7:48 pm

Brake Pads

British Belting and Asbestos of Cleckheaton
1879 - Company incorporated as W. Willson Cobbett Limited. Originally a manufacturer of non-asbestos transmission belting; the company later extended its activities into friction materials and asbestos textiles, packings and jointings.
1897 - Became public company.
1911 - The company's name was changed to Scandinavia Belting Co
1925 - W. Willson Cobbett acquired the British Asbestos Company. The name was changed to British Belting and Asbestos (BBA).
1937 - Manufacturers of "Halo" Brake and Clutch Linings. "Mintex" Brake and Clutch Linings. "Phoenix" Asbestos Packings and Jointings. "Scandilex" and "Scandinavia" Belting.
1960 - Conveyor belting for mines.
1960 - Joint venture Morgan-Mintex company formed by Morgan Crucible Co and British Belting and Asbestos (BBA) to manufacture sintered friction materials which will be marketed by the Mintex division of BBA
1961 - Manufacturers of asbestos textiles, packings and jointings; conveyor and transmission beltings; friction linings and industrial plastics. 2,100 employees
1962 - The sintered Morgan-Mintex product was discontinued because of lack of demand
1963 - Motor Show exhibitor. Mintex clutch and brake pads etc.
1967 - Following reorganisation of the group's activities, the parent company became a holding and management company under the name BBA Group Limited.
1969 - Cape Asbestos Co acquired BBA's 26 per cent shareholding in English Asbestos Co Ltd, a Trist, Draper subsidiary.
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Early cars were fitted with Mintex M33 brake pads front and rear up until January 1962 when Mintex M40 were specified:
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In June 1963 the pads were changed yet again to M59:
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Original Mintex pads were painted light green, with the part number clearly printed so that it could be read even after the pad had been installed in the caliper. Here we have new old stock examples of M33 and M59:
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The M59 pad on the right clearly has a higher concentration of metallic particles than the M33 on the left so it looks like Jaguar were working hard to improve the 'E' Type's brakes in the face of criticism:
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Many thanks to Dave Schinbeckler (bopperd) for bringing this to my attention and for the photos.

Note: if anyone has a photo of an original (preferably NOS) M40 I would be glad to receive it to complete the post
Last edited by Heuer on Fri Nov 20, 2015 6:50 pm, edited 2 times in total.
David Jones
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Heuer
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#184

Post by Heuer » Fri Nov 20, 2015 6:36 pm

Half Shafts

Hardy Spicer supplied the halfshaft assemblies on the early cars, part number C15226.
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Hardy Spicer and Co. of Birch Road, Witton, Birmingham
1903 - E. J. Hardy and Co was formed to import motor parts from France
1912 - Private company
1926 - Name changed to Hardy, Spicer and Co
1937 - Manufacturers of propeller shafts and flexible discs."Bound Brook" Oil-less Bearings. "Compo" Oil-retaining Bearings. "Genuine Hardy" Flexible Couplings. "Hardy Spicer" Universal Joints
1937 - In move to broaden its markets outside the automotive one, purchased Phosphor Bronze Co Ltd
1938 - Invested in their own forging plant which was developed under separate subsidiary 'Forgings and Presswork (Birmingham) Ltd'. New company formed - 'Birfield Industries' - for purpose of acquiring Hardy Spicer and Co and the undertaking and assets of Laycock Engineering Co.
1939 - 'Salisbury Transmission Co Ltd' was formed as a subsidiary to make hypoid rear axles for motor cars but production was delayed by start of WWII; the Salisbury Axle was made by Spicer Corporation in USA which would be valuable experience when production started which was expected after WWII
1942 - 'Bound Brook Bearings' formed as a private company subsidiary of Hardy Spicer and Co
1945 - Advert as makers of needle bearings. propeller shafts. Hardy Spicer and Co - a Birfield Company
1961 - Manufacturers of cardan shafts, universal joints and constant velocity joints for motor and agricultural trades. 2,500 employees.
1963 - Motor Show exhibitor. Universal joints and flexible couplings
1966 - Raymond Brookes ? who had become chairman of GKN the previous year ? completed the takeover of the Birfield automotive components group to become 'GKN Birfield Transmissions'

Up until about July 1962 half shafts consisted of a steel tube with a yoke welded on either end. There is a 5/16" steel rod running through the centre, secured at each end with a copper washer, a steel washer, and a circlip. Later cars had smaller diameter solid half shafts:
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The function of the steel rod is a bit of a mystery but the combination of copper and steel washers suggests it is prepared for rotation of the yoke so is probably a fail safe in case of a fracture in the shaft weld. It would prevent the parts flailing about which could cause major damage:
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U/J's

The U-joints, or Journal Assemblies, have the Jaguar part number 8694 and Hardy Spicer 1410 series #K.5-GB.10. They are 4 3/16" long and have a diameter of 1 3/16":
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Finding correct replacements is difficult because the part numbers cast into the U/J bear no resemblance to the actual part number - the casting was a generic item for various u/j parts. An early cross-reference lists these part numbers as correct for the early 'E' Type: K.5-GB.10; K.5-GB103; K.5-GB164; K.5-GB179; K.5-LGB179; 4151-179W; 4151-179Y; HS-179. They cross reference to GKN Uni Cardan #18200 and GKN Lobro #U200 and the Hardy Spicer 1410 series of modern replacements.
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A NOS Hardy Spicer U/J #4151-179W. Without the box it is almost impossible to tell if the part is correct as the part number is not on the forging:
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Rebuilt half shaft:
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Many thanks to Dave Schinbeckler (bopperd) for the photos and research.
Last edited by Heuer on Sun Nov 22, 2015 12:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.
David Jones
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Heuer
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#185

Post by Heuer » Sun Nov 22, 2015 11:50 am

Hearings for Hubs

British Timken of Chester Road, Aston, Birmingham 7, division of the Timken Roller Bearing Company Canton, Ohio

1898 - Henry Timken obtained a patent for the tapered roller bearing
1899 - incorporated as The Timken Roller Bearing Axle Company in St. Louis
1901 - the company moved to Canton, Ohio, as the automobile industry began to overtake the carriage industry. Timken and his two sons chose this location because of its proximity to the American car manufacturing centres of Detroit and Cleveland and the American steel-making centres of Pittsburgh and Cleveland
1937 - British Timken established in Chester Road, Aston, Birmingham to manufacture tapered roller, parallel roller and ball bearings
1939 - Aircraft Industry Suppliers
1941 - Works built on a green-field site at Duston, Northants, to produce roller bearings. At its peak over 4,000 people were employed in the factory
1945 - Associated company is Fischer Bearings Co of Wolverhampton
1955 - John Pascoe, MD of the British Timken Division of the Timken Roller Bearing Company became chairman of Aberdare Holdings.
1959 - Sir Frederick John Pascoe became British Timken's chairman
1987 - production facility established in the city of Jamshedpur, India
2002 - Production ceased at Duston; the works were demolished over the next 4 years and production moved to Poland

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The wheel bearings were made by Timken:
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The rear outer bearing #C19066 with Timken part number 18690:
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The box for a replacement bearing shows the Jaguar part number. The bearing was protected from rust by a 'Vapour wrapper':
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Unlike the universal joints, the bearing actually has the OEM (Timken) part number engraved on it:
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Inner #18590 and outer #18690 bearings:
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Last edited by Heuer on Sun Nov 22, 2015 4:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.
David Jones
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Heuer
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#186

Post by Heuer » Sun Nov 22, 2015 4:52 pm

Hub Carrier - Grease Retaining Cap

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The rear wheel bearings are lubricated with grease through a hole in the side of the casting. The hole is plugged with a stamped steel cap #C18124:
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The caps are a friction fit and can be removed with a screwdriver under the lip and replaced with a gentle tap from a wooden mallet. The centre of the cap has a small hole designed to relive any pressure build up in the carrier through heat and friction. If this hole is blocked there is a high likelihood the cap will be forced out. On the left is an original cap and in the centre is a modern reproduction with no discernible hole. This will need drilling out before fitting otherwise the cap will pop out on a high speed run. On the right is a modern rubber seal which has the benefit of being able to stretch under pressure:
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David Jones
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Geoff Green
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#187 IRS Cage

Post by Geoff Green » Wed Nov 25, 2015 4:15 am

IRS Cage

Changes in IRS cages were introduced to make installation easier. The part number remained the same #C17014 for all types, only changing for Series 2. The first type had two round holes per side for the mount studs. With this configuration the mounts were installed on the cage and the unit was raised to the car making installing shims and bolts difficult.

1961 #C17014 2 holes:
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The second type had one round hole and one slot per side. With this configuration the two mounts were attached to the cage and two attached to the car. The slot allowed mating the IRS to car easier.

1964 #C17014 1 hole 1 slot:
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Perfection was realized with the third type which had two slots per side. The four mounts could be attached to the car and the cage raised up to the studs, the slots easing the instillation.

1967 #C17014 2 slots:
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Bottom Plate

The bottom plate #C17023 has a long opening in the early cars and later changed to the smaller opening #C20651.

#C17023 Large Opening:
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#C20651 Small Opening:
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Ian Howe
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#188

Post by Ian Howe » Fri Nov 27, 2015 7:10 pm

Handbrake Compensator

The handbrake compensator changed during production, #C18374 being fitted to early cars and #C20402 being fitted from chassis numbers #850555, #877567, #860664, #886263 and subsequent. The later compensator has a longer 'arm'.

Early Handbrake Compensator #C18374 :
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Later Handbrake Compensator #C20402:
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Heuer
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#189

Post by Heuer » Fri Dec 04, 2015 2:33 pm

Screw, Set, securing Rear Calipers to Final Drive Unit Housing

Early cars used a set screw #C15759 (produced by Newton in this example) with a special tab washer #C18491 to secure the caliper to the drive housing:
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The tab washer was a single-use part replaced each time the caliper is removed. They are still available from SNGB:
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Once in place the tabs are hammered over to prevent the set screw moving:
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From September 1962 the method of securing the calipers was changed. Drilled setscrews #C20624, spring washers and locking wire replaced the setscrews and tab washers previously used:
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David Jones
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Heuer
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#190

Post by Heuer » Fri Dec 04, 2015 2:47 pm

Front and Rear Brake Calipers

In December 1961 the front and rear calipers were changed from malleable iron to cast iron and can be differentiated by a 'C' cast into the outer face:
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David Jones
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ralphr1780
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#191

Post by ralphr1780 » Fri Dec 04, 2015 5:15 pm

This thread has become my ultimate guide for many details during the reassembly process of my S1 3.8 OTS 878222.
Presently concerned about the relay for the cooling fan: this is supposed to be located on the right side of the header tank support.
But it is not there neither for the Red OTS 881640, nor for the Blue FHC 887530 featured in page 1, both unrestored cars. While the relay is well visible in the other 2 cars the Green 128YUH and 9600HP.
Were there any variations?
Then, the bonnet valance/airduct + front diaphragm/headlamp mounting panels + inner wings appear sometimes simply painted (glossy) without any chipguard coating, and sometimes with a chipguard coating.
What was the factory original here?
Thanks in advance!
Ralph
'69 OTS + '62 OTS - Belgium

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Heuer
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#192

Post by Heuer » Fri Dec 04, 2015 5:47 pm

Relay for Fan Motor (33232/A-6.RA)

The Lucas relay for the fan motor #C18122 was mounted on the right hand side of the header tank support bracket. It was deleted on LHD cars in October 1962 and on RHD cars in June 1963:
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Sound Deadening Compound:

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David Jones
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ralphr1780
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#193

Post by ralphr1780 » Sun Dec 06, 2015 9:58 am

Thanks David. Clear conc the cooling fan relay, obviously as usual the cut was not always sharply applied as the original harness on my 878222 (oct 62) is welll with the relay under the header tank.
Ralph
'69 OTS + '62 OTS - Belgium

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Heuer
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#194

Post by Heuer » Mon Dec 07, 2015 12:09 pm

Rubber Mount for Attachment of Cross Member to Body

The rubber mountings #C17198 are attached to the rear cross member with eight set screws and twelve nylock nuts. There is a small error in J30, which lists the set screws as bolts. The correct part number is UFS.131/7R, not UFB.131/R:
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The rubber mount, part number #C17198:
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There are two types of 5/16" UNF self locking (Nylock) nuts used - a tall one and a short one. #C8667/2 is on the left, #C8737/2 is on the right (circles indicate UNF):
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One set screw, a flat washer and the short nut #C8737/2 are used to secure the rubber mount to each tab at the front of either side of the cage, as shown by the red arrow:
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Installed:
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Thanks to Dave Schinbeckler (bopperd) for taking the time to document the rebuild.
David Jones
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Heuer
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#195

Post by Heuer » Mon Jan 18, 2016 12:49 pm

Service and Spares Administration

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This 20 page hardback book was produced by Jaguar Cars Inc and sent out as a confidential document to Distributors and Dealers. It provides a fascinating insight into the way Jaguar operated at the time. You can view the book here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/rda6knrz5d8gs ... s.pdf?dl=1

My thanks to Ray McPhail who owns the book and Dave Schinbeckler for scanning it.
David Jones
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Ian Howe
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#196 Early Bonnet Feature

Post by Ian Howe » Wed Jan 20, 2016 11:34 am

Front Diaphragm Assembly

Just taking the bonnet apart on car number 875039. The LH front diaphragm normally mounts the 8 pin connector for the front lamp harness. On the early bonnets the RH diaphragm also had the mounting hole for the male connector! In the pictures below the factory modification to blank the hole can be seen.

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Heuer
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#197

Post by Heuer » Mon Feb 15, 2016 4:55 pm

Thermostats

The early cars had a alcohol filled bellows type thermostat #C12867/2 which had a moving sleeve. They were a made by Smiths, AC Delco, Quinton Hazel and Lucas although Factory Fit were marked Smiths X.43570/28 though probably made by AC. Jaguar specified an open/close temperature of 70?C/75?C or 159?F/168?F.
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Note: this is a photo of an 86C version

The by-pass 'slot' is open when the thermostat is closed and the coolant remains within the engine to shorten warming-up time. When the thermostat commences to open the screen moves upwards (to the right on the photo below), gradually shuts the by-pass and coolant now flows from the engine to the radiator.
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However these alcohol filled bellows thermostats were not suitable for use above 4psi as they are not strong enough. When the coolant pressure was increased to 9psi after cars #879043/850656/861090/888240 a Waxstat type #C20766 thermostat was used but is no longer available and supersedes to #C27650. SNGB sell a suitable sleeved Waxstat as part #C3731/1* at ?25.
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There is a reproduction bellows thermostat with sleeve available which is made for MG's, is an almost exact copy of the original thermostats and functions correctly in the XK engine. http://www.mossmotors.com/Shop/ViewProd ... exID=93097
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If you are looking for original thermostats the following part numbers should be used: Quinton Hazell QT 100/74, Lucas LF1, AC (DELCO) TF-1, Smiths 85025/74, Smiths X43560/28. Be aware there are also sleeveless bellows thermostats which are not suitable for the E-Type and the sleeved bellows version is only suitable for low pressure (4psi) systems. As an alternative a Land Rover SIIA/SIII thermostat #532453 can be used with some minor machining of the water outlet elbow. Details elsewhere on the Forum.
Last edited by Heuer on Mon Apr 04, 2016 2:43 pm, edited 2 times in total.
David Jones
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#198

Post by Heuer » Sun Feb 28, 2016 1:53 pm

Tie Wire

The steering rack bellows was secured to the pinion end housing by tie wire C15211.
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This is the original on car #875343
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The part is no longer available but you can buy annealed 9" 'Potato Bag Ties' (?12 for 1,000) http://tinyurl.com/hl7dgqh or make your own using a 9" length of 15 or 17 SWG wire:
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Use a turnbuckle as a tool to tighten:
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Thanks to Dave Schinbeckler (bopperd) for the photos.
David Jones
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#199

Post by Heuer » Fri Mar 18, 2016 12:46 pm

Radiator Cap

Up until cars #850656/879043/861090/888240 a 4 lb/sq in radiator cap was fitted as part number C18460. The cap was supplied by AC-Delco as their part number 850501 and was used in conjunction with the convoluted hose and bellows thermostat. This is an original radiator cap as fitted to car #875343 and note the simple '4' stamp to designate the pressure rating:

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This is a NOS AC-Delco 850501 radiator cap:
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David Jones
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#200

Post by Heuer » Tue Mar 22, 2016 3:04 pm

Clutch Slave Assembly

The clutch slave cylinder fitted to all 3.8 cars was C.16989, made by Lockheed with their part number 110272 which is on the casting:
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The Lockheed part number 33427 is molded into the rubber boot:
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The circles indicate a UNF thread:
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An interesting form of self-locking nut? The 'P' indicates a tensile strength of 35 tons/in:
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Thanks to Dave Schinbeckler (boppered) for the photos.

Note: Bolt-Grades: A, B, P, R, T, V, X; Nut-Grades: A, P, R, T
Where minimum tensile strength is:
Grade A = 28 tonf/in?
Grade B = 28 tonf/in?
Grade P = 35 tonf/in?
Grade R = 45 tonf/in?
Grade T = 55 tonf/in?
Grade V = 65 tonf/in?
Grade X = 75 tonf/in?

Common application of nut:
Grade A nut for A, B, P, R bolts
Grade P nut for T bolts
Grade R nut for V bolts
Grade T nut for X bolts
Last edited by Heuer on Mon May 23, 2016 5:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
David Jones
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