Converting a V 12V E TYPE to fuel injection

Talk about the E-Type Series 3
User avatar

Topic author
Peter Collins
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Mar 19, 2010 5:32 pm
Location: Kidderminster

#1 Converting a V 12V E TYPE to fuel injection

Post by Peter Collins » Fri Mar 19, 2010 6:51 pm

Hi everybody
I am a new member from Kidderminster ,it was suggested to me that some members may be interested in the conversion of my V 12 E type to fuel injection , I will keep it simple , I took on a restoration project that Mark Kempson had started many years ago but did not complete . He had collected together a rolling chassis V12 2+2 and an engine from a 1989 XJS 5.3 which i have now installed into a renavated chassis . You might say why would you want to do this , well after owning a number of classic cars with carburettors and thier problems i wanted to put a modern touch on it . For example i can go into my garage and turn the key and the engine will zoom into life instantly with the ecu controlling the cold start .I have lots more to say ie/ location of ecu and wiring loom if anybody is interested.
Peter Collins

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links


MarkE
Moderator
Posts: 882
Joined: Wed Mar 26, 2008 8:00 pm
Location: Forest of Dean, Gloucestershire
Contact:
Great Britain

#2

Post by MarkE » Fri Mar 19, 2010 10:09 pm

Hi Pete, and welcome! For everyone else, I?m the Mark that Pete bought the car from, and I?ve been hoping that this story would emerge, as it?s one I find really inspiring and shows what true enthusiasm (and a lot of hard work) can do.

Firstly, to wind back, I bought this car from Paul Webb, who also sold me the other two, back in 1999. He phoned me from California one night and said that he had the final ?type? for the collection, and would I be interested? It was an unusual car for Paul to buy as it was a rolling shell, which had lost its engine and box, interior, bonnet, doors and tailgate in the US after the engine had blown up and the car taken off the road. It was a very straight car with very little rust, so had to be bought.

Over the following few years, I hunted down the correct panels and bits and pieces for the car, and had an engine and gearbox built for it. That was the easy bit, and after a lot of soul searching decided to sell on the project as no progress was being made on the other Jags.

Enter Pete, who I?m sure like the others didn?t believe my advert on eBay that I had a virtually rust-free project for sale, but once seen the deal was done pretty quickly. Whist the engine had been built correctly using a low mileage XJS unit with an E type sump, front cover and other bits and pieces, it didn?t have any wiring, ECU, distributor, sensors?or anything else! But a ?spares? XJS was also available for parts, and the new owner had to figure out what was needed from the XJS, how it all worked and what went where on the E type.

That?s pretty challenging, but combined with turning a rolling shell into a stunning and registered car in under 3 years whilst doing the work pretty well single handed is just fantastic.

Here are some pictures of the car as I sold it:

Image

Some of the bits and pieces I acquired over the years for the car:

Image

I found this interior in a wrecked S3 in Wales, along with a lot of RHD goodies:

Image

These bonnets were bought from a great E type fan in Wales, but I think they were not used by Pete in the end as he found a better one?did you sell them on?

Image

And finally the engine and box, built up by an ex-Jaguar engineer, who?d been building V12 engines from the beginning. It took three years to find the correct sump, front cover and manifolds / heatshields!

Image

So quite a jigsaw puzzle to take on, and the tricky bit of getting the engine up and running still to sort out..

There?s a lot of story to tell Pete! I?m definitely interested in how you tackled the fuel injection side, including what sensors and distributor you used, and especially how on earth you did the wiring! But I?m also interested in getting the body sorted, the trimming, and all the rest of the mechanical work?.the good, the bad and the bloomin? awful!

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar

harryetype
Posts: 347
Joined: Thu Oct 04, 2007 8:15 pm
Location: Newbury Park, California

#3

Post by harryetype » Sat Mar 20, 2010 10:57 am

Welcome to the forum Peter.

it would be nice if you could attach some pictures of your car, I think the combination of 2+2 V12 and EFI is a great combination.

Excellent contribution Mark, I thought you seemed very well informed on V12 E-type EFI.
Harry

My Dads old V12 TOM 32
1968 Roadster

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links


christopher storey
Posts: 5086
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2008 3:07 pm
Location: cheshire , england
Great Britain

#4

Post by christopher storey » Sat Mar 20, 2010 12:06 pm

Mark : is that a Maine Coon Cat?

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar

Heuer
Administrator
Posts: 13583
Joined: Sat Mar 01, 2008 5:29 pm
Location: Nottinghamshire
Great Britain

#5

Post by Heuer » Sat Mar 20, 2010 12:23 pm

christopher storey wrote:Mark : is that a Maine Coon Cat?
Having owned one I don't think so. They are huge, with tufted ears, large furry paws (for swimming) and a propensity to behave more like a dog than a cat. Despite their size they are phenomenal hunters with an amazing ability to climb and traverse most obstacles. Keeping them out of swimmming pools and ponds is a bit of a challenge though!
David Jones
S1 OTS OSB; S1 FHC ODB

Add your E-Type to our World Map: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=1810

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links


MarkE
Moderator
Posts: 882
Joined: Wed Mar 26, 2008 8:00 pm
Location: Forest of Dean, Gloucestershire
Contact:
Great Britain

#6

Post by MarkE » Sat Mar 20, 2010 4:55 pm

Albert is an oriental short haired chocolate point tabby, a great ratter, frightened of the ducks but chums with a moorhen. The chap who built Pete?s engine gave him to me as he was about to create problems for their breeding dogs!

But back to the plot. I?m well versed in sorting out issues with the XJS engine, which is pretty straightforward and as set up by the factory. But taking a car that wasn?t designed for EFI and converting that with a bunch of different bits and pieces is a different matter, and I guess you?d have to go back to basic principles to get it all to work well.

Some of the questions I have for you, Pete, when converting an E type with XJS parts are?.

What ECU, distributor, resistor packs and sensors are required from which model XJS? Is there a ?best? combination for use on the E Type flat-head V12?

How much of the XJS loom can you use, and how is that integrated with the standard E type loom? Are any additional fuse systems required?

What modifications are required to the fuel tank, if any, and is a swirl pot used to provide a steady supply of fuel?

What ancillaries are required, such as air filter boxes, inertia switches and fuel pumps, and which model XJS is best to provide these?

Where is the best place on an E type to position all this additional kit, and where do the extra looms run?

I?m sure there will be much more!

For folks reading this who haven?t looked at a Jaguar EFI system, it can look pretty daunting at first. Upon opening the bonnet of an XJS, most guys smile, shake their heads and ask where on earth you?d start to understand what?s going on. But when it?s broken down into ECU ?feed? signals, it?s actually a lot more straight forward than carburettors, once you?ve figured out what the ECU is trying to do.

A breakthrough for me was buying an early XJS which came with a diagnostic card for trouble shooting the EFI system. This was provided presumably by a nervous Jaguar / Leyland support team, or at least, one who didn?t trust Lucas at all! Given that the XJS was nearly three times the price of the last E type, the sort of customer who could afford one in 1975 was the company chairman, who surely wouldn?t have lifted the bonnet, let alone got his card out to try and diagnose any problems he was having. The card was only issued for the first few months, then I think that the marketing department had it withdrawn as it reduced customer confidence in the reliability of the Jaguar product.

Here is the card?.it provides a nice simple view of the components and the issues arrising from them going wrong.

Image

Image

Image

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar

Topic author
Peter Collins
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Mar 19, 2010 5:32 pm
Location: Kidderminster

#7 Converting a V 12V E TYPE to fuel injection

Post by Peter Collins » Sat Mar 20, 2010 6:41 pm

In answer to Marks questions; The first thing to do is to get in contact with Roger Bywater and AJ6 Engineering , for twenty pounds they do a practical guide on how to convert a V12 E Type to Fuel Injection .
This tells you every thing you need from your donor car which should be an XJS HE from the period of 1981 to 1988. There are two ways to go about this job one is to use a complete HE engine which would go straight in , the only thing you would need to do would be to change the thermostat housings to your E Type ones and change a bit of the pipe work .
The other way is to convert your own E Type engine , and Rogers guide explains a step by step explanation on what is needed from your donor car .
On the subject of ECU s there are four that are recommended the DAC 4478 , 4119 ,4586 and the 6336 .
The Distributor from a HE is different from the opus system but it will fit in its place but again this is explained in rogers guide .
You need the resistor pack and a couple of the sensors .
Once you have got your donor car you need to strip out the ECU wiring loom which runs from the back to the front of car (it runs from the right hand side rear and down past the rear seat and alongside the prop tunnel ) . The wiring loom can be taken out in one complete piece as Mark can testify , but the easiest way is to cut it inside the car as far forward as you can because you will have to shorten the loom anyway.Also as you take it out you can leave the relays , sensors and the resister pack hanging from the wiring loom. I found that the most inportant thing was the location of the ECU which i originally put in the boot with the pump , but i found that running the wires from back to front along the cills was to conjested and having to run the vacume pipe from inlet manifold to ECU as well was just too much . I got it all working and everything was running fine but was not satisfied because it looked so ugly so i cut it all back out again and relocated it in the top of the passenger foot well . Then i used the left hand drive steering column hole to run the wiring loom through.
You may think that this is all beyond you but i can assure you it isn't , i am a carpet weaver by profession so if i can do it i am sure anyone can.
There is more to be said but i think i have gone on long enough .
Peter Collins

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar

Topic author
Peter Collins
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Mar 19, 2010 5:32 pm
Location: Kidderminster

#8

Post by Peter Collins » Mon Mar 22, 2010 9:10 pm

The wiring loom is independant to your original E Type loom .
The fuel tank on the E Type is adequate as long as its kept over an 1/8 full at all times ( well on my car it is ) a swirl pot is an unnecessary luxury but if you wanted to go down that root it would be the icing on the cake .
Air filters , again you can use the XJS air filters but the outer part of the filter box is too bulbous and catches the the inner bonnet panel , so on my car all i needed to do was not move the air tubes but get the hacksaw as close to the tube as possible along its length and saw it off ( i can send pictures if any one is interested ) . Another way is to take the left hand outer filter box and put it on the right hand side pointing towards the bulk head with no modifiation but i think this looks ugly so i prefer the other way .
You can incorporate the inertia switch which is all in Rogers diagram , this is just an impact switch which would turn the pump off in the unlikely event you had an accident , when you give it a tap a trigger pops up and to disarm it you push the trigger back down .
The fuel pump is the XJS pump from the donor car which has to be placed as low as possible in relation to the fuel tank ( mine is in the boot stood upright on the right hand side where one of the drain holes for the boot is ) and then the fuel filter again XJS is at the front hanging from one of the space frames where your fuel pipe comes up from the bulk head .
There must be other people out there who have done this conversion and i would like to interact with you . Be back with you all soon .
Peter Collins

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links


MarkE
Moderator
Posts: 882
Joined: Wed Mar 26, 2008 8:00 pm
Location: Forest of Dean, Gloucestershire
Contact:
Great Britain

#9

Post by MarkE » Mon Mar 22, 2010 9:47 pm

Good stuff, Pete. But you know, I can?t help thinking that it?s a bit more complex than you say!! All those weeks and months (and years) of slaving away in the garage figuring it all out have blurred, and now you?re only remembering the good bits!!

Have you any feeling yet for what sort of mpg the car is now doing, and how she feels on the performance front?

Pete has sent me these photos of the car taken recently for putting up on the site whilst he gets into Photobucket. I must say Pete that I?m blown away?what a fantastic looking car. It?s also quite a significant one being made in December 1970, 3 months before the launch of the S3.

Here are the pictures:

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links


WDRV12

#10

Post by WDRV12 » Tue Jun 15, 2010 1:04 pm

I agree Rogers ?20 download is not bad BUT it is made out that you just need a donor car and thats it ! Not actually true when it comes down to the water rails !!!!! How did you do yours ?

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar

Topic author
Peter Collins
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Mar 19, 2010 5:32 pm
Location: Kidderminster

#11 Water Rails

Post by Peter Collins » Sat Jun 26, 2010 11:57 am

Sorry for the delay in answering your question but i have had computer troubles . I used the original thermostat housing at the front and the XJS donor ones at the rear and joined them together with some 32 mm water hose piping. The join was achieved by putting the XJS ones in the laithe and turning the casting down to 32 mm , another way of doing this is to get a piece of 32 mm alumium rod and bore it out and turn it down to fit into the rear water ways .
The front left hand thrmostat housing has to be drilled and tapped to 12mm x1.5 ( i would have to double check that size ) this is for the temperature probe for the ECU . Unless any one out there can think of a better way ?

Pete
Peter Collins

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar

vee12eman
Posts: 711
Joined: Mon Nov 26, 2007 7:14 pm
Location: Down South
Kiribati

#12 Gearbox in the early picture

Post by vee12eman » Wed Jun 29, 2011 11:03 am

Hi Peter,
I noticed that in one of the earlier posts, showing the engine, it is fitted with a Getrag Gearbox, did you fit this gearbox and how did you get around the problem of gear linkage in the wrong location? Also, did you use a spacer between the gearbox and bell housing, or did you have one of the specially made bell housings which mates a V12 to the gearbox? I have one of these, made my own gear linkage then had to take it all out again to shorten the tube around the input shaft which protects it from the clutch release bearing carrier (also acting as a guide for it) and it seems to be working, but the car is not quite roadworthy yet and I am interested in any further improvement I can make.

Great conversion and is one I hope to emulate one day myself, when I can find a suitable donor car.

Regards,
Simon
Last edited by vee12eman on Sun Oct 28, 2018 8:23 am, edited 1 time in total.
Simon S-Y
Series III FHC

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar

PeterCrespin
Posts: 4437
Joined: Fri Mar 05, 2010 8:22 pm
Location: Gaithersburg, Maryland.
Contact:
United States of America

#13

Post by PeterCrespin » Wed Jun 29, 2011 1:03 pm

Never heard of a special bell connecting a Getrag to a V12 but that bell is the correct one for the Getrag anyhow, hence no spacer at the gearbox side. Note the slave cylinder mounting for the forward-facing XJ-S/XJ40 or X300 slave used with this arrangement. Hope there's room as it is tight at the side of the box. The adaptation in Pete's set-up looks to be between the bell and the rear face of block. You can use a spacer to mate a Getrag to a standard V12 bell housing (designed for the 4-synchro of course), although the dowels need slight modifying for anything other than an early 5.3 block and a 6-litre block has to be drilled as well.

The Getrag uses a double-rose jointed linkage cantilevered off the selector shaft and a pin fixed to a bracket across two upper casing screws. This brings the lever out in the right place for an E-type console and is what I have in my S2 (which uses a standard XK bell and slave).

The Getrag lever bits are not bullet-proof, however, since the bracket welds came unstuck on mine and left me stranded with a floppy gear lever. I had to dismantle the centre console and tunnel cover, to manually shove the box into third gear for a 20 mile drive to Dave Kerr's welder one weekend. Thanks Dave.

Pete
1E75339 UberLynx D-Type; 1R27190 70 FHC; 1E78478; 2001 Vanden Plas

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar

PeterCrespin
Posts: 4437
Joined: Fri Mar 05, 2010 8:22 pm
Location: Gaithersburg, Maryland.
Contact:
United States of America

#14 Re: Gearbox in the early picture

Post by PeterCrespin » Wed Jun 29, 2011 2:11 pm

vee12eman wrote:
Getrag Gearbox....how did you get around the problem of gear linkage in the wrong location? Also, did you use a spacer between the gearbox and bell housing, or did you have one of the specially made bell housings which mates a V12 to the gearbox?
You can see the adapter plate (steel in my case) just in front of the gearbox, and the front pin and gear lever shackle for the altered change mech in this photo.

http://www.xkedata.com/gallery/zoom/?id=115063

It shows my trial-fit of the Getrag before I refurbed the car.
1E75339 UberLynx D-Type; 1R27190 70 FHC; 1E78478; 2001 Vanden Plas

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links


Woolfi
Posts: 301
Joined: Thu Jan 28, 2010 5:57 pm
Location: Germany
Germany

#15

Post by Woolfi » Thu Jun 30, 2011 10:05 am

It would be very interessting to read about the performance und the gas consumption of this car, compared to a normal EV12 with 4 Strombergs. No believe, but a REAL test.
I don't believe, that the power will be higher, if the EV12 with carbs has a bigger pipe into the air filter box. I have changed the tiny 32mm trumpet to a pipe of 58 mm inner diameter on my EV12 6,0 with 4 Strombergs. The neddles have to be a little bit less thick from the middle to the top. Otherwise the motor will work to weak.
Is this motor with the injection running and starting well ? Has this car a perfect idle ? Have you still the original silencer on the car ?
Regards Wolfgang Gatza

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar

vee12eman
Posts: 711
Joined: Mon Nov 26, 2007 7:14 pm
Location: Down South
Kiribati

#16

Post by vee12eman » Thu Jun 30, 2011 11:21 am

Hi thanks for the answer, I have uploaded some images of the gear box and linkage below. As you can see, the Series 3 transmission tunnel is much wider than that of the Series 2 cars and also longer than the short wheelbase cars (2 seat FHC and Series 1 & 2 Drophead). The gearbox I fitted has an extension which would not fit in the early cars and as you can see from the picture on the engine crane, the bell housing requires no spacer, being special to type.

Image
Fitting the engine and 'box, no spacer between the bell housing and gearbox as the bell housing is designed for the job

Image
The finished job, before fitting the cover and gear lever.

Image
A side view.

Image
An early shot showing the original gear lever, I replaced it later with the stainless rod shown in one of the other shots.

I have driven the car - all of 100 metres and it did seem to work ok, I wait to see how it is on the open road.
Again thanks for the pictures, they at least indicate that my linkage seems workable.

Regards,
Simon.
Simon S-Y
Series III FHC

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar

PeterCrespin
Posts: 4437
Joined: Fri Mar 05, 2010 8:22 pm
Location: Gaithersburg, Maryland.
Contact:
United States of America

#17

Post by PeterCrespin » Thu Jun 30, 2011 1:50 pm

The bell and gearbox match and require no spacer, but the bell/block interface has had to be reworked as they do not match. This is some times done with a spacer or as in this case by reworking the rear face of the block (RFOB). In fact the two pictures appear to show different arrangments, presumably the protruding redundant lumps have been carved off where the Getrag 265 bell flange did not match the V12 RFOB.

There was never a V12 with a Getrag, which is why no Getrag bell fits. The only manual V12s were the E-type and a couple of hundred or so early XJ-S cars. They used the same bell and it is the only manual bell that bolts directly to the back of a V12 block. The downside is that of course it only fits a Jag 4-speed, or you can use the adpater for a Getrag.

Even the Jag bell doesn't fit all V12s without some work. It fits perfectly to the early 5.3 block and the bolts but not the dowels also line up for the later 5.3 and the early 'special' 6.0L engines (like the XJRS which were enlarged 5.3s). The dowels swapped position when they went from the early BW auto box to the later GM box so the bell or block have to be modified slightly to fit. Conversely, the later GM dowel position was retianed on the later true 6.0L engines that went to the electronic 4-speed auto, but the RFOB and bolt pattern changed to suit that 4L80E transmission so that doesn't fit the Jag manual bell either. Thankfully, that change involved extra metal between the 9 o'clock to 12 o'clock sector of the RFOB and the earlier boss pattern is still in the casting so once you sort the dowels you just have to drill and tap for the Jag manual bell to match up.

The engine/gearbox in this sequence has had the RFOB modified to fit the Getrag bell and you can see both redundant and extra bosses/holes in the first picture especially viewing the area from the front. The other picture seems to show the parts blended better with bosses sawn off etc. but I thought the EFI shot would be the later one? Either way, fitting a Getrag to a V112 is not trivial or bolt-up, whichever way you do it.

Pete
1E75339 UberLynx D-Type; 1R27190 70 FHC; 1E78478; 2001 Vanden Plas

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar

PeterCrespin
Posts: 4437
Joined: Fri Mar 05, 2010 8:22 pm
Location: Gaithersburg, Maryland.
Contact:
United States of America

#18

Post by PeterCrespin » Thu Jun 30, 2011 2:07 pm

By the way, is DJB the make of the bell? Any idea where those come from Mark? I've heard of Dellow making special bells in Australia for Toyota 5 speeds. Be nice to have a bell that fits a Getrag direct to a V12, even if you have to tweak things for some of the various bolt/dowel positions. Does it use standard V12 clutch parts and flywheel/starter?

Pete
1E75339 UberLynx D-Type; 1R27190 70 FHC; 1E78478; 2001 Vanden Plas

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links


Woolfi
Posts: 301
Joined: Thu Jan 28, 2010 5:57 pm
Location: Germany
Germany

#19

Post by Woolfi » Thu Jun 30, 2011 5:07 pm

The Getrag has two different type of "teeth" on it's "income". Some Getrags are done for BMW and some are done for Opel.
The "teeth" fitting into the BMW clutch plate are very similar to the teeth of the EV12 clutch plate. But there is a small difference. If you mount the normal EV12 10,5" clutch plate to the "income" of the BMW-Getrag you can feel, that you can turn the plate a little bit more than you can turn a plate for a BMW. If you use the plate of a EV12 , MAYBE you can get a "shattering" clutch, if you lift the clutch-pedal.
I have a Getrag from a BMW in my EV12 with 6,0 XJ81 motor. We have used a special clutch plate. 10,5" with the teeth perfect fitting for the BMW. This combination is working well.
You have to excuse my poor english.
Regards Wolfgang Gatza

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar

vee12eman
Posts: 711
Joined: Mon Nov 26, 2007 7:14 pm
Location: Down South
Kiribati

#20

Post by vee12eman » Fri Jul 01, 2011 9:28 am

OK, as the photos are of my car, gearbox, engine and bell housing, I will explain what I do know about them.
The gearbox, bell housing and flywheel were an ebay purchase, simply advertised as a 5-speed Getrag conversion for a Jaguar, including an e-Type. No gear linkage was included, that is all my own work. All pictures in the sequence show the same gearbox/bell housing and engine combination and no work or modification took place after I bought them, so all pictures show exactly the same items with no modification. There is, as you can see, no spacer between bell housing and gearbox and I assumed the bell housing had been specially cast, or modified for the Getrag fitting. Are you saying that the bell housing I have fitted (marked DJB) is an original Jaguar bell housing modified to take the Getrag box? Unfortunately, I took no photos to explain this better.
The engine is actually not the original, I believe the block came from an early XJS, as the original was not usable (the internals of my engine were re-used where possible). However, the bell housing bolted up with no problems. However, the rest of the fitment wasn't without problem. When first running the car, I had a squealing noise, which I thought was the clutch release bearing. I managed to get the gearbox out of the car without removing the engine, although I had to remove the propshaft (which mates to the Getrag with splines) and to do that I had to drop the rear suspension. Once all out of the car, I discovered the there is a tube surrounding the input shaft to the gearbox. The clutch release bearing is mounted on a carrier and engaged by a hydraulic system. This carrier slides along the tube, which keeps it central and protects the input shaft. This tube was fouling the rear of the clutch friction plate and I had to cut it down slightly. Because I had such difficulty removing the gearbox, I decided to replace the clutch release bearing (the clutch was already knew, but the release bearing was of unknown condition, but looked new). I was under the impression that the 'box was from a six cylinder XJS (with the AJ6 engine) and ordered the release bearing from one of these cars - it didn't fit. I measured the internal diameter of the old bearing, which was 46mm and researched the internet and everywhere I could think of to find a suitable bearing. I couldn't find anything and in the end I had the carrier machined to 45 mm and fitted a much more common bearing with this dimension; several cars had this internal dimension for a release bearing, I just had to find and choose one (from memory it came from a 4.1 litre V8 Cortina - they have those here in Australia!).
All went back together well and the car has no squealing now. Gearchange is a bit notchy, but then the car has only driven about 100 yard since fitment, I don't think I have even had the car in fifth gear yet.
Anyway, the whole thing cost less than a four speed conversion (the car was originally automatic), original manual gearboxes were very expensive, and the work has been very satisfying, despite the problems.

Hope this helps,

Simon
Simon S-Y
Series III FHC

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

Post Reply Previous topicNext topic