FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Talk about the E-Type Series 1
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Heuer
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#81

Post by Heuer » Tue Jul 29, 2014 2:38 pm

Lucas Battery

Joseph Lucas Limited, Formans Road, Birmingham. The car battery factory was split into different departments including the stores, warehousing, assembly shop, charging shop and the MILAM (Made In Lucas Acid-proof Material) department. The MILAM shop at Formans Road was a separate area of the factory that was partitioned off.
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The battery used on the 3.8 E-Type was a MILAM cased Lucas FRV 11/7A, 9 5/8" x 7 5/8" x 5 5/8", 57Ah capacity, tar topped with separate Lucas branded black filler caps and six exposed round copper cored lead 'links' connecting the cells. The battery had Lucas lettering moulded on the side in black (not white or the 1970's red and gold logo sticker!) and the filler plugs were black to Jaguar specification. Lucas did supply other batteries with red coloured plugs (made them easy to find when you dropped one) but not on the E-Type ? probably an aesthetic decision by Sir William! It sat on a moulded ribbed battery tray made of black Bakelite with a spout for a rubber drain tube in the lower rear corner. Under the Lucas 'helmet' type battery connectors there were anti-corrosion felt washers, green for the negative post and dark red for the positive post. The Parker-Kalon self tapping screws holding down the helmet connectors to each terminal post were slot head (documented by a Lucas bulletin). Every Lucas battery was supplied with printed instructions beneath one of the plugs detailing maintenance instructions and specific gravity. Cars for export were fitted with Lucas FRVZ 11/7A 'dry charged' battery which required filling at the final destination - the instruction label was therefore printed in red. A fully charged battery should have an SG of between 1270 and 1290.
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The FRV11/7A battery code translates as follows:
FR = Ferguson (tractors) special battery - the XK engine required a heavy duty battery so this was chosen
V = type and size of plates
11 = number of plates per cell
/7 = special assembly to Jaguar requirements (black plugs for a start)
A = terminal layout and nominal voltage
Z = dry charged for export

The battery was held in place by a shaped clamp with rubber pads to cushion it. Up to chassis #850572/877660/860722/886381 there were four of these 1 inch x 1 inch pads, one in each corner, but this was subsequently changed to add two additional filler pads and then changed again to two long pads. Jaguar changed the design because of the potential for arcing from the terminals to the hold down bracket and leaks from the battery. The leaks were caused by the bracket deforming the rubber case at the join with the bitumen. If you want to stick with the original battery design regularly check there is no debris, grease or oil between the metal hold down and the adjacent terminal. Do not over tighten the wing nuts, ensure the Thackary washers are installed and use the rubber buffers.
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Two hooked rods secured the battery assembly with wing nuts, plain washers and 'Thackery' double spring washers. The wing nuts were larger than the repro ones (left) commonly available. Correct one are available from http://www.etypeparts.com:
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The woven terminal cables were Lucas moulded lead 'helmet' style secured to the battery with slot head Parker-Kalon screws. For reason's I cannot understand Jaguar seem to have built the car around the battery because the terminals are on the engine side which makes it very difficult to remove either the right hand connector or indeed the battery with the blower motor and heater box in place. Later cars had an L shaped screwdriver in the tool roll to facilitate screw removal.

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From 1965 a more modern version of the FRE 117/A battery was used with internal links and red plugs. It also seems Jaguar responded to complaints about the difficult access to the terminals by moving them from the inside to the outside:
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All the parts are available except the correct battery tray. The current ones are either thin plastic or stainless steel (neither correct) and are remarkably difficult to fit without some metal bending as a bulkhead seam intrudes so worth checking before the body goes to paint. Only the two piece rubber pads are available but these can easily be converted to four pads for use on the earlier cars. The Thackery spring washers can be difficult to find, try a Google search. The red and green terminal post felt anti-corrosion washers are still available from motor factors in the US. Exact copies of the Lucas FRV 11/7A do not seem to be available in the UK but this one is available in the US - "Hard rubber raised letter case, tar top with Lucas black caps, 9" x 6 3/4" x 9"". Costs $260.00 plus $199.11 shipping to the UK + duty + VAT - but if you want to be concours correct ............:
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They are AGM (Absorbent Glass Mat) so easy to ship and maintenance free although slightly smaller in size then original. However the G22L/B battery can be damaged if it is charged using gel-filled battery procedure so follow the included instructions carefully!:

Note: The period photo of 9600 HP shows a battery with the 'Lucas' script highlighted in white but I believe this was just for publicity. Many period Lucas adverts picture the batteries with highlighted script in white, red, yellow or gold but these appear to have been added by the illustrator for effect. Batteries fitted on the production line were all black with six black Lucas marked plugs.
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Lucas produced their 'GT' and 'S' range of batteries from the late 1953 which had a single red plastic manifold top and were link-less (i.e. no exposed links between cells) which gave a very clean and modern look. These batteries were not suitable for the E-Type because the link-less system could not carry the heavy cranking current required by the XK engine:
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The gold lettering was applied by the illustrator; supplied batteries had no such highlights.

Fosseway Performance supply Shield batteries which are rubber cased and a reasonably close match to the Lucas although the link bars are the wrong shape, the filler caps are not marked Lucas, they are slightly over-size and there is no embossed Lucas logo. Ditto Lincon Batteries. The rubber cased batteries are prone to leaks especially near the terminals.
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Best option is to buy a new plastic cased battery from Halfords or Yuasa - the modern specification/size is a DIN 65011 battery approx 236 x 178 x 182 mm (LWH). e.g. Yuasa 12v 50Ah 530A Car Battery YBX3113.
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Remove the labels and attach one of these kits depending on what look you want:
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Available from Weskcar on eBay

Note: MILAM, introduced in 1926, was manufactured using blue asbestos so if you find an original battery and want to modify it with modern gel internals be very careful! It was made by mixing three ingredients together (pitch, blue asbestos finely chopped and something else) in heated containers. The hot and ductile mix was carefully weighed and kneaded before being placed in a hydraulic press mould and a pressure of 200 tonnes applied for five minutes. The press is opened and two highly polished Milam cases are produced. These are left for 24 hours to cool before being tested at 50,000 volts.
Last edited by Heuer on Wed Sep 09, 2015 9:44 am, edited 40 times in total.
David Jones
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#82

Post by Heuer » Wed Jul 30, 2014 12:59 pm

The first 500 cars (up to #850091, 875385, 860004, 885020) were fitted with the Lucas RB310 control box which is easily identified by its alloy body. These regulators are not rare as they were fitted to a wide range of vehicles in the 1950's.
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Later cars were fitted with the black Bakelite bodied RB340 control box which had the spade connectors at the bottom. The Lucas RB340 came in 11, 22, 25 and 30 amp versions, all indistinguishable from each other and Jaguar used the 22 amp version on the Mk II 2.4's. The 30amp versions were marked as such with yellow crayon:
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The mounting brackets were also different for each controller.
Last edited by Heuer on Sun Nov 16, 2014 11:29 am, edited 3 times in total.
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#83

Post by Heuer » Sun Aug 10, 2014 2:42 pm

Service Manual
The Service Manual was printed by St Nicholas Press Ltd in Birmingham and cost £3.0.0. The first editions, distributed in December 1961, had a green plastic folder with "Jaguar "E" Type Grand Touring Models Service Manual" printed in white on the cover and spine. The cover also has an E-Type growler as seen on the horn push. The pages were two hole punched and held in place by two brass bolts. There is no version number in the lower left corner of the front page. There is no makers name on the vinyl folder.
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The later, more common, Service Manual has the ?3.8? designation preceding the name ?E Type? on the spine, cover, title and introductory pages to the various sections. It also has the print series numbers in the lower left hand corner - E/123/X where X is a number from 1 to 8 although only E/123/1 and /2 were printed during 3.8 production. These later editions were dispatched in a green four ring loose leaf binder made by Krause West Germany and eventually included a supplement for the 4.2 cars.
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Spare Parts Catalogue
Printing of the SPC was done by H. A. Smith & Son Limited of Coventry (founded 1919, ceased trading 2003) and cost ?1/5/0. There are two versions of the 3.8 SPC both designated J.30. The first was published in August 1961 and the second print in June 1963. The first version was contained in a bronze textured vinyl four ring binder cover with the Jaguar wings, ?Spares Division? and ?Jaguar ?E? Type? heavily embossed in white, an embossed red and gold Jaguar growler badge and the words ?Spare Parts Catalogue for Grand Touring Models? in red, the latter on both cover and spine. The 'Publication Number J.30', 'Price ?1.5.0' and ?issued August 1961? are also on the cover. The name of the folder manufacturer A F Walker Ltd, London N1 is embossed on the inside back vinyl cover. Walkers specialised in the production of high quality embossed ring binders and folders. It really is a thing of beauty and well worth sourcing if you have an early car.
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First version front page:
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The June 1963 edition binders are flat printed rather than embossed and use a different more modern font for the text (although they still show 'issued August 1961' on the cover). I have seen June 1963 text versions with the earlier embossed folder however so the changes must have been phased. Internally the first edition and later reprint differ in the date on page (ii) and the number of pages, the later having 322 as against 307 pages of the first edition to reflect changes in the parts fitted to the later cars.
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The June 1963 printing has both the 'R' and 'RA' engine numbers to reflect the continuation of the engine numbering system.
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SPC J.30 June 1963 is the one that has been reprinted and is still available with a soft cover binding.

There has been much confusion over the meaning of the "Code: Bentley's Second" which is printed on the first page of all three books between the telephone number and the Telegraphic address. It has nothing to do with editions or reprints, it refers to the 5 letter coding of business phrases used when sending telegraphs to reduce the length of messages and hence costs:
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Last edited by Heuer on Mon Nov 30, 2015 5:30 pm, edited 13 times in total.
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#84

Post by 265bhp » Sun Aug 10, 2014 7:15 pm

David

To concur with your note that you have seen June 1963 text versions with the earlier embossed folder, as that is the one I have. Thanks for this addition to the data base as the reasoning for 2 Spare Parts folder covers had me confused about which came first.

Jonathan
1963 3.8 FHC in slow restoration mode
1974 2.7 Carrera now as an RS Touring

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#85

Post by Heuer » Mon Aug 11, 2014 11:39 am

Operating, Maintenance and Service Handbook

An 'Operating, Maintenance and Service Handbook' aka Owners Handbook was supplied with each car and this was printed by W.W. Curtis Ltd, Coventry. W.W. Curtis Ltd provided printing of books and manuals for Joseph Lucas, Massey Ferugson, Standard Triumph Motor Company, Automotive Products Ltd, Whitworth Aviation, Humber and many others including Jaguar Cars Ltd. They also printed the E-Type lubrication chart.
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There were several print runs each denoted by a serial number on the first page taking the form of E/122/X where X can be from 1 to 7 indicating print run.
Print runs (of which about 10% were used for spares and lost copies):
E122/1 = 5.000 copies
E122/2 = 2.500 copies
E122/3 = 5.000 copies
E122/4 = 2.500 copies
E122/5 = 2,500 copies

Cars produced:
1961 = 2,333 (450/month from August)
1962 = 6,259 (525/month)
1963 = 4,204 (350/month)
1964 = 2,697 (450/month)

Date cars fitted with handbooks version:
E122/1 = April 1961 (4,500 Amendments & Revisions booklets included from September 1961)
E122/2 = April 1962
E122/3 = May 1963
E122/4 = Nov 1963
E122/5 = April 1964

The first version E/122/1, supplied up until April 1962, only shows the Budget lock 'T' key to open the bonnet, has a red stick on 'Caution' on the inside cover page and the holy grail of the first handbook, but usually missing - the 8 page 'Amendments and Additions' booklet, supplied from August 1961 onwards updating E/122/1 for inside bonnet locks among other things. They cost 7/6d from the Service Department if you needed a spare.
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From mid 1962 the E/122/2 edition showed the internal lock mechanism and included the amendments and additions printed in the main text.
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On this E/122/3 (mid 1963) edition the number is printed on the cover:
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Later editions removed reference to the Budget locks and Shelley jack but most of the illustrations remained. E/122/6 featured illustrations of the padded console and vinyl dash and like E/122/7 (the last version) the pictures are of the 4.2 cars; these were printed after 3.8 production stopped and held by the Spares Department. The version widely available as an excellent reproduction is based on E/122/5 and printed by Brooklands Books. A red vinyl handbook cover with the Jaguar wings in gold but this was supplied with the very early E-Type's until the brown vinyl pouch became available from September 1961. Before then the documents were supplied in a Jaguar marked brown manilla envelope.
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A lubrication chart was also included and date stamped:
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There were also regional issues of the handbook:
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Warranty Card

Every car had a Warranty card which had to be filled in by both owner and dealer and part of it returned to Jaguar:
UK (and Europe?) 'white stripe' warranty card
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USA 'blue stripe' warranty card:
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Last edited by Heuer on Tue Dec 01, 2015 2:59 pm, edited 29 times in total.
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#86

Post by Heuer » Sat Aug 16, 2014 3:35 pm

Service Bulletins

Jaguar produced regular service bulletins for Dealer service departments to explain product changes, upgrades and hints/tips. They were printed on both sides of quarto (8"x10") size paper with Royal Blue ink for the text. Jaguar supplied a two ring black vinyl binder printed with gold text to hold them:
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The pages were numbered and sectioned in accordance with the Service Manual and dated. The bulletins did not necessarily apply just to the E-Type but covered a range of models where applicable (e.g. engines).
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They can be quite interesting to read - you will see in March 1961 Jaguar called the paint colour of the cylinder head "Gold" not pumpkin or orange (it was actually BS381-356 'Golden Yellow' until replaced by the metallic Bradite 'Old Gold') but I do not believe they were available to E-Type owners and as a result complete sets are very rare indeed. I have a set which I am scanning to pdf and it is a very time consuming job but will eventually be in our Knowledge Base.
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#87

Post by Heuer » Mon Aug 18, 2014 5:57 pm

Commission Plate

Jaguar referred to the data plate as the vehicle 'Commission Plate'. It was a 3.5? x 6.5? piece of aluminium with an acid etched black background leaving the text in silver and held in place by four rivets. The plates were made by E. Rudd and Co.

E. Rudd and Co
of Island Works, Holyhead Road, Handsworth, Birmingham, 21. Telephone: NOR. 3336/7 (2 lines). Telegraphic Address: "Nameplates, Birmingham"

1890 - Company founded by Ernest Rudd.
1937 - Listed Exhibitor - British Industries Fair. Nameplates in all metals and ivorine: Printed, Chemically Engraved, Cast, Machined, Enamelled, Stamped. wiring diagrams in Metal. Stainless Steel Nameplates. Clock and Ammeter Dials. Motor Car Dashboard and Tread Plates. Professional Nameplates in Enamelled Bronze. (Stand No. Cb.300)
1995 - E. Rudd and Co Ltd merged with Macnamara Tone, to become Rudd Macnamara Ltd and now utilises the following manufacturing processes: Anodising, Etching, Chemical engraving, Machine engraving, Heat impression, Vac Forming, Stamping, Embossing, Screen printing, Lithographic printing, Reverse screen printing, Heat impression printing and Pad printing.

There were several versions of the commission plate used on the 3.8 E-Type. The early cars had a plate in a similar format to the one used on the C-Type?s D-Type?s and XK?s which had a list of recommended lubricants, the sixth column of which was marked S.A.E. (The Society of Automotive Engineers. The SAE established a numerical code system (20, 30, 40 in the case of the E-Type) for grading motor oils according to their viscosity characteristics and a separate viscosity rating system for gear, axle, and manual transmission oils. These commission plates seem to have been used on the very early cars, certainly no more than the first 500 cars, possibly fewer. They also bore the words 'Chassis No.' the same as the XK plates suggesting Jaguar used up whatever supplies it had to hand.
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There was another type of ID plate used on the early cars - this one has the SAE column but also has separate STEERING BOX and WHEEL HUBS rows.
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Commission plate from a 1953 C-Type for comparison:
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The second version of the commission plate was quite different. Firstly Jaguar stopped using ?Chassis No.? and replaced it with ?Car No.? presumably because the E-Type was a monocoque construction and had no separate chassis. Secondly the original six columns of ?Recommended Lubricants? was revised entirely (losing its full stop) with seven columns and new headings. All cars had a small etched brass "Made in England" plate riveted below the commission plate.

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There are several reproduction plates available but only one is acid etched, the rest are screen printed which will make them short lived. The original plates also had an unusual mistake in that ?TEXACO? was etched as ?TEX ACO?. Again only one supplier has this original etching. This is the plate Classic Jaguar in the USA supply:
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As for the reason for the gap introduced in the TEXACO name (which stands for TEXAs COmpany) I can only suggest the drawing office was influenced by the style of advertising at the time. Even though the spacing between letters is the same it looks much bigger between the X and the A:
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And once you see it as 'TEX ACO' your brain seems to want to always see it that way!

Cars exported to France had an additional plate for some reason which was attached by the local Distributor (notice the different font used):
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NB: as always this is work in progress - if know more please add the information or PM me and I will do it.
Last edited by Heuer on Sat Sep 06, 2014 12:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.
David Jones
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#88

Post by Heuer » Thu Aug 28, 2014 4:19 pm

Motifs

The Jaguar 'growler' motif appeared on the E-Type horn push and badge bar. They were produced by Fattorini & Sons of 33 Barr St, Birmingham.

1827 - Company founded by Antonio Fattorini, an Italian speaking immigrant, who settled in Yorkshire where he established a number of retail outlets specialising in jewellery, watches and fancy goods including barometers and created a family dynasty
1919 - Thomas Fattorini set up factory in Trafalgar Works, 5 Hockley St Birmingham to take advantage of the demand for badges and medals to sports clubs (especially the Football Association clubs)
1919 - Purchased Joseph Moore Ltd, Harford Works, Harford St. Birmingham
1927 - The range of products widened to include sporting cups and trophies, Insignia for Associations, Civic Authorities and National Governments, emblematic jewellery, badges and medallions. Produced the famous range of Robertsons 'Golly' collectors badges.
1958 - Factory name changed from Joseph Moore Ltd to Fattorin & Sons Ltd, 33 Barr St, Birmingham. The works is on the corner of Hartford and Barr streets
1964 - Branch was opened in Manchester initially to do enamelling as it was impossible to get staff in Birmingham due to labour shortages in the motor industry. The Manchester branch grew to become the centre for the design, development and manufacture of plastic badges.
2014 - Greg Fattorini is the present Managing Director of the company being the 6th generation of the Fattorini family to manage the business. Together with the Birmingham and Manchester factories, the company also has a sales office in the City of London to service the greater London area. They provide badges to the automotive industry (including Jaguar), medals, swords, insignia etc.

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The fact these 'motifs', as Jaguar preferred to call them, were outsourced to a specialist jeweller, badge and medal maker should come as no surprise because they are of very high quality and despite being subjected to the elements (bonnet motif) or an irate driver (horn push) most survive today with little sign of discoloration or wear. The same cannot be said of the reproductions however which are a poor facsimile of the original, although you only really notice when they are side by side. The badges were made of clear plastic, embossed from behind with the motif, gilded with gold leaf, enamelled and painted with a grey protective layer. Owners take them for granted and chuck away the originals willy-nilly but they really are things of beauty.

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The horn push ancillary parts CC5 were made by Lucas and the whole thing finally assembled at Jaguar:
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The horn pushes have the part number scratched into the rear:
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Geoff Green added:

Horn Push date marking

33570B with the date of 4/61
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Last edited by Heuer on Wed Sep 03, 2014 9:40 am, edited 1 time in total.
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#89

Post by ALAN COCHRANE » Sat Aug 30, 2014 10:08 am

David

I'm currently rebuilding my 2SJ washer to later 5SJ standard with a modern Lucas pump. I was trawling the web for photos of the 5SJ and came across this item currently for sale on Ebay:-

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/LUCAS-SCREEN- ... 3a948c0543

It appears that not only was the 5SJ fitted to the E-Type's glass bottle but it also drove a remote impeller-similar to the 2SJ setup. This is confirmed by the one I've canibalised off my TR250 which is a plastic bottled version.

Interestingly the ?99 price tag is only for the lid and impeller assembly. The glass bottle is extra!

Alan
Alan Cochrane

1962 S1 OTS-850389,1968 Triumph TR250, 1971 Triumph GT6 Mk3, 2008 Porsche Boxster RS60 Spyder

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#90

Post by Heuer » Wed Sep 03, 2014 10:54 am

Joseph Lucas Ltd

Joseph Lucas Ltd of Great King Street, Birmingham, 19. Telephone: Northern 5201 (12 lines). Telegraphic Address: "Lucas, Birmingham". (1937)

1860 Joseph Lucas, who was formerly employed by Elkington and Co, started in business, selling buckets, shovels, and other items of hollow-ware door-to-door
1870 Started manufacturing hand-lamps and lanterns, and a special type of ship's lamp invented by Joseph Lucas.
1872 Lucas took his eldest son, Harry Lucas, into business.
1875 Set up the Tom Bowling lamp works in Little King Street, Birmingham, producing a lamp of the same name for the fishing industry. They decided to concentrate on lamps which would burn the new petroleum-based lamp oil.
1878 Company made first cycle lamp for the new bicycle market, which were soon required to carry lamps after dusk. Lucas's first cycle lamp was called the "King of the Road"
1882 Harry Lucas became a partner in the business, Joseph Lucas and Son, for the manufacture of pressed metal goods, including ship, coach and carriage lamps.
1892 Formation of public limited company to raise finance to build a five-storey factory close to the original site in Little King Street. Joseph was chairman, and he and his son Harry were joint managing directors. The company had 700 employees; Walter Chamberlain, youngest brother of Joseph Chamberlain, was appointed to the board.
1897 A public company, Joseph Lucas Ltd was formed with a nominal share capital of ?225,000 to take over the Lucas business. The company was registered on 12 November, to acquire the business of Joseph Lucas and Son, manufacturers of cycle lamps and other accessories.
1901 Supplier of Wells-Lucas engine oil supplied by Henry Wells Oil Co of Manchester
1902 Supply by the company to the motor industry of non-electrical goods began, and was followed a few years later by the company's entry into the electrical field with the manufacture of car batteries and dynamos, and lighting sets for sale to car owners. Oil lamp production began.
1914 Manufacturers of dynamo lighting systems for motor cars, motoralities and cyclealities. Specialities: "Tom Bowling" ship lamps, motor car lamps, horns. Employees 1,600.
1914 Expansion in the manufacture of electrical equipment followed the company's acquisition for the sum of ?9,000, of the share capital and business of Thomson-Bennett which made magnetos. From this early takeover of the Thomson-Bennett magneto business stemmed the paramount interest of Lucas in the supply of electrical equipment for the motor industry.
1914 The company started its main growth in 1914 with a bulk order contract to supply Morris with electrical equipment.
WWI The company was engaged principally in the manufacture of shells, fuses and electrical equipment for aircraft and military vehicles. In this period it also began the manufacture of starter motors which had by then been developed in America.
1920 Peter Frederick Blaker Bennett, one of the two former partners in the Thomson-Bennett business, was appointed joint MD with Harry Lucas
1920 Exhibited at the Commercial Motor Exhibition at Olympia with electric lighting and starting units.
1923 Bennett and Oliver Lucas, a grandson of the founder of the Lucas business, were Joint Managing Directors of the company. They established close personal relations with the principal vehicle manufacturers and themselves became leading personalities in the motor industry. By 1923 over half its output of starting and lighting equipment was supplied to Morris. The value of the Morris business to Lucas is illustrated by the fact that in the four years from 1921 to 1925, Morris's sales of vehicles jumped from 3,000 a year to 55,000. At the same time, however, Lucas was selling in increasing quantities to other manufacturers, including Armstrong Siddeley Motors, Rover, Standard and Triumph, with the result that by 1926 the proportion of Morris business to Lucas's total sales had dropped to about one-third.
1924 Acquired Brolt.
1925 Separate manufacturing operation at Formans Road, Sparkhill, making small lead-acid accumulators for wirelesses
1925 Acquired EIC Co. For the year 1925-26, Lucas's production of starting, lighting and ignition sets for supply as initial equipment averaged 2,000 a week.
1926 Acquired C. A. Vandervell and Co and Rotax Motor Accessories Co, its 2 largest competitors.
1926 Gained an exclusive contract with Austin. Lucas obtained the contract for the following year for the whole of Austin's requirements of starting, lighting and ignition equipment. Between 1920 and 1925 Lucas laid down the pattern of its present distribution and service arrangements. It established its own depots in London, Liverpool, Leeds, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Newcastle, Manchester, Birmingham, Bristol, Dublin and Belfast for local distribution to wholesalers, traders and the public and for service and repairs. Between 1925 and 1929 a number of wholesale electrical stockists and repairers were appointed as Battery Service Agents to stock, supply and service not only Lucas batteries but also other Lucas motor vehicle goods, including spare parts for repairs. Lucas also established a number of its own trade and repair outlets which it operated through County Electrical Services, a company it formed for the purpose through nominee shareholders. Lucas did not publicly disclose its ownership of these outlets and has said that the reason was that it wished to test customers' reactions to its products and service, and that the information obtained through its own depots was always coloured to some extent and not sufficiently reliable. The development of the company in the inter-war years was marked not only by rapid internal growth due to the increased demands of the vehicle manufacturers but also by the acquisition of a number of other businesses and by certain important agreements made with other electrical equipment manufacturers, British and foreign. Lucas has said that amongst the reasons for its present dominant position in the motor electrical industry are (i) that its competitors got into financial difficulties with the collapse of the boom after the first world war, (ii) that competitors were in a relatively worse position than Lucas was when the American motor trade threatened to submerge the British motor trade even in the British market (before the introduction in 1915 of the McKenna duties) and (iii) that when the outlook was black it acquired certain competitors who were in financial trouble. Lucas attaches importance to the fact that among the businesses of which it acquired control were its two biggest competitors C. A. Vandervell and Co and Rotax.
1927 Acquired B. L. I. C..
1929 Acquired A. Rist and Powell and Hanmer.
1930 Acquired M. L. Magneto Syndicate and North and Sons.Lucas and Smiths established a trading agreement to avoid competition in each other's markets.
1931 Following a manufacturing and market sharing agreement between Lucas and Robert Bosch A.G., Stuttgart, the well known German manufacturer of electrical equipment for motor vehicles, the name of C. A. Vandervell and Co (in which Bosch had acquired a 49% interest from Lucas) was changed to C.A.V.-Bosch Ltd. By the agreement made in 1931 between Lucas and Bosch the ownership of Bosch Ltd. was transferred to C.A.V.-Bosch Ltd.
1933 With Chloride Electrical Storage Co and Oldham and Son , Lucas set up the British Starter Battery Association.
1937 Acquired Globe and Simpson and the British operations of Bosch.
1938 Manufacture of Girling brakes was taken over by Joseph Lucas Ltd but the patent remained in possession of New Hudson until the rights were, in turn, purchased in 1943. Lucas then moved their Bendix brake and Luvax shock absorber interests into a new division which became Girling Ltd.
1939 Acquired Express Magneto (Repairs) and Electrical Co.
1939 Opened new factory at Shaftmore Lane, Hall Green.
WWII Lucas produced electrical equipment for military and civil vehicles and for aircraft. Many of its standard products were adapted for war uses: for example, its windscreen-wiper motors were used to operate aerial cameras and its starter motors were adapted for the electrical control of tank gun turrets. Outside its normal fields, Lucas produced a wide variety of military requirements including gun turrets, aircraft wing sections, primers, fuses, anti-aircraft shells, bombs of various kinds, control and release mechanisms and metal pressings. It also undertook research work for the Government, including research and development work on jet propulsion in factories it took over specially for the purpose
1943 Acquired David B. Irvine (Edinburgh) and Girling brakes, which absorbed the Bendix and Luvax operations.
1944 Acquired Avon Electrical Services.
1945 Acquired Bon Accord Electrical Repairs.
1948 Acquired Butlers.
1949 Acquired Auto Services Electrical Co (Falmouth).
1951 Name changed.
1953 Acquired Wrexham Motor and Electrical Engineering Co.
1954 Acquired Starting, Lighting and Ignition Services (Midlands).
1954 Acquired Auto Electric Services (Stourbridge).
1954 Lucas sold Bosch Ltd back to the German parent Bosch for the sum of ?25,000.
1957 Lucas acquired a 50% interest in Siba Electric.
1958 Acquired Cox and Co
1960 Acquired Harry Rawlings and Co.
1961 Manufacturers of electrical equipment and accessories for motor-cycles, aircraft, cars, and cycles, including lighting sets, dynamos, dip and switch reflectors, horns, coil ignition, batteries, magnetos, lamps, mirrors, windscreen wipers, hydraulic jacks, brakes, starters, wrenches and generators. Also manufacture fuel and combustion system equipment for gas turbine engines and oil burning equipment for marine boilers.
1962 Acquired Gravesend Car Electrical Co.
1963 Motor Show exhibitor. Wide range of products.
1968 Took over its major competitor in diesel injectors in the UK, Simms Motor and Electronics Corporation
1969 Acquired Keelavite Hydraulics, and Vactric Control Equipment. Also acquired Premier Precision to expand the facilities available for the Lucas Gas Turbine Equipment activity
1970 Manganese Bronze Holdings sold its 50% interest in Siba Electric to Joseph Lucas (Industries) Ltd. Acquired H. M. Hobson[13]
1971 Reorganised the aerospace-related activities including Rotax, Lucas Gas Turbine Equipment, the former Special Products Group of English Electric Co, H. M. Hobson, Vactric and Premier Precision; formed Lucas Aerospace Ltd to integrate these activities
1972 Centenary of company. Now employed 100,000 people with 60 manufacturing and distribution companies.
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Every classic car owner seems to have a joke about Joseph Lucas but the above biography shows he created a huge voracious company with constant expansion (I gave up going beyond 1972!) and were one of Jaguar's main suppliers.

This is what Lucas supplied for the 3.8 E-Type:
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Notable exceptions are:

1. HT leads, plug caps (Champion)
2. Blower motor (AC-Delco)
3. Instruments, with the exception of the Ammeter, (Smiths Industries)
4. OTS rear view mirror (Winguard)
5. Flat backed headlamp bowls (Lucas supplied Jaguar with round back bowls for the saloons)
6. Ignition switch lock (Wilmot Breeden)
7. Petrol tank element unit (shown as "TF.1104" in the SPC - Trico-Folberth?)
8. Radio and speakers (Smith's Industries)
Last edited by Heuer on Sun Jan 25, 2015 5:00 pm, edited 5 times in total.
David Jones
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#91

Post by Heuer » Wed Sep 03, 2014 1:49 pm

Lamps

The front and rear lamp units were supplied by Lucas as complete assemblies. The lenses were made from Diakon (see page 11 for details).

Side and Front Flasher Lamps:
The front lamps were common to both FHC and OTS with either a white or amber flasher lens depending on market.
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The original front side lamp lenses were of a simple design which had a series of 12 evenly spaced horizontal internal ridges or flutes running from left to right. For some reason (damage to mould or better light output?) Lucas/Jaguar changed the internal design of the lens. Where previously it was a random array of small dots it became a central 'Fresnel' type lens. This was achieved by removing the central part of the mould and letting in the new design. The fluted lenses are no longer available because the original moulds were irrevocably changed. I do not know when this change occurred as it is undocumented by Lucas or Jaguar but observation of original cars suggests March 1965 (latest observed original car is 1E 30806) so the first 2,000 or so 4.2 cars had them as well.

The lenses are held in place by special screws #6806 which in turn are retained on the lens by a rubber washer #8620 (3/8" diameter - I bought these (M4 9mmx4mmx1.5mm): http://shop.deltarubber.co.uk/rubber-wa ... herm4.html The correct screws and washers are essential otherwise the very fragile retaining mounts on the lens will crack and render them useless. As these early lenses are now incredibly rare use utmost care and the correct fittings!

If you need to repair the lenses they are made of Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) a transparent thermoplastic often used as a lightweight or shatter-resistant alternative to soda-lime glass and historically has often been called acrylic glass. The material was developed in 1928 and first brought to market in 1933 by the Rohm and Haas Company, under the trademark Plexiglas. It has since been sold under many different names, including Acrylite, Lucite and Perspex. PMMA can be joined using cyanoacrylate cement (commonly known as superglue), with heat (welding) or by using solvents such as di-chloromethane (methylene chloride) or trichloromethane (chloroform) to dissolve the plastic at the joint, which then fuses and sets forming an almost invisible weld. Several commercial glues are available to do this e.g. Technicoll Polychloride available from 'The Tuning Shop'. Scratches may easily be removed by polishing or by heating the surface of the material.

Ian Howe adds "Another photograph of the fluted lights showing the simple horizontal lines and slotted screws. Interestingly, it also shows the earlier rubber seal between the bumper and bonnet which is narrower than the later seal. The early seal is now available through Owen Day I believe," Also notice the chrome decorative band is different on the original which has a curved section compared to the reproduction which is just a flat piece of metal wrapped around the lens.
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Later style:
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Between the side and indicator lens there is a metal blanking plate to prevent light bleed. These are not supplied with the repro lenses:
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Exact copies of the early lenses are now being offered by Forum member Marek - contact via PM
Aged original on left, copy on right:
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Stop Tail, Flasher and Reflex Lamps:
The rear lamps were different for FHC and OTS. There were different lens combinations (red/red or red/orange) depending on market. The FHC lamp housings were changed in October 1962 (#860478/886013) to adapt to the extensive reworking of the bodywork done at this time. This resulted in a part number change from C17931/C17932 to C19854/C19855.
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The chrome plated lens retaining slotted screws (Lucas 106871; Jaguar #8606) were of a unique design and featured a lead in nipple on the end. The thread is odd as well. They also have the retaining washer (161385/#6524) which is usually missing on restored cars. The part 54572032 in the above diagram is a rubber spacer for the reflex lens (reflector) seating.
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Last edited by Heuer on Fri Dec 11, 2015 1:19 pm, edited 25 times in total.
David Jones
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#92

Post by neil4444 » Wed Sep 03, 2014 5:57 pm

For info Hutsons/BAS have just run a test batch of rear lamp gaskets for S1 OTS. I've been the guinea pig. They're a significant improvement on others currently available however need a bit of manual adjustment on internal cut-outs to enable them to fit over the brackets on rear wing. Should be available soon.
Neil
1962 S1 OTS
1967 S1 FHC
1967 S1.5 FHC

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#93

Post by Heuer » Thu Sep 04, 2014 10:58 am

Wiper Rack Assembly

This was produced by Lucas as a complete motorised unit specifically for the E-Type:

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The 'Arm for Windscreen Wiper' #8663 was made by Lucas and specified as being chrome plated, 10.5" long with a tip cranked at 10.5 degrees. The wiper blade #8664 was supplied by Lucas (marketed as 'Rainbow') and specified as being 11" long and chrome plated (after market and modern replacements are polished stainless steel). Some cars are reported to having been fitted with Trico 'Aeramic' blades. Trico was a supplier to Jaguar so it is possible they were fitted at the factory.
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Around November 1963 the wiper blade specification was changed to 12" long #10232 and the wiper arm #10079 was a modification to compensate, with a 10 degree cranked tip rather than 10.5 degrees used with the 11" blades. The arm length remained the same and both parts were supplied by Lucas. The change to the crank angle does not sound like much but Jaguar and/or Lucas obviously thought it was important.
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Best wiper blades available today are the Lucas/Aeramic copies at a cost of about ?16 each. Avoid the ?6 Tex blades as they look clumsy and don't work very well on the E-Type's curved screen.
Last edited by Heuer on Sat Sep 06, 2014 3:17 pm, edited 7 times in total.
David Jones
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#94

Post by Heuer » Thu Sep 04, 2014 12:24 pm

Distributor

Up until engine number RA1382 (March 1963) a Lucas DMBZ6A vacuum advance was fitted. After that a Lucas 22D6 of a different design was used. Notice the cover caps are also different. The two are interchangeable although there were changes to the vacuum pipe. From engine number RA2289/90, August 1963, rubber sleeves were fitted to the HT leads where they entered the distributor.
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There are differences between the originals and reproduction parts (original screw terminals, split washers and organiser at top):
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Original is Bakelite, modern version is plastic. Note 'Remove Cap to Oil' on original:
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Part number embossed on underside of original:
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Last edited by Heuer on Wed Feb 24, 2016 3:21 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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#95

Post by Heuer » Thu Sep 04, 2014 1:38 pm

Horns

The Lucas WT 618 hi/low note horns were fitted to all 3.8?s. These were located in the front bonnet beneath the headlights. After car numbers 850499/877154/860435/885970 (October 1962) the horn design was changed slightly with an altered top cover to accommodate a new resistance terminal block:

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The 4.2 cars had the smaller Model 9H horns fitted to the picture frame and these have also been retrofitted to the 3.8's by owners.
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#96

Post by Heuer » Fri Sep 05, 2014 10:27 am

Wiring Harness Cover Assembly

Part #BD20728 "Cover assembly, protecting wiring harness at L.H. side of dash" was an aluminium pressing on the 3.8 cars, trimmed in interior colour.
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For the 4.2 cars #BD20728 was made of steel and was of a different much narrower shape although the part numbers remained the same.
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The 3.8 version is much fatter and noticeable when you look into the passenger compartment and one of the big originality give-away's! Richard Smith can now supply either version but do not order by part number - specify it is for a 3.8 car.
Last edited by Heuer on Fri Sep 05, 2014 8:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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#97

Post by Heuer » Fri Sep 05, 2014 3:01 pm

Coolant Hoses

Hoses and other rubber parts were supplied by the Dunlop subsidiary John Bull:

1906 The 'Leicester Rubber Company' was formed by John Cecil Burton and his brother Cecil Hubert to sell imported cycle tyres
1908 The Company's patriotic 'John Bull' trade mark came into force
1915 Started to manufacture its own bicycle and pram tyres at its Evington Valley Road site in Leicester
1928 Started to mass produce car and motorcycle tyres at the Leicester site
1934 Name changed to the John Bull Rubber Company
1937 An associated company was formed to manufacture rubber to metal components ? 'Metalastic Ltd'
1955 The group of companies merged to form The John Bull Rubber Co.
1958 Became part of the Dunlop Rubber Company.
1961 - 1965 Supplier of tyres, hoses and fan belts to the automotive industry with product marketed under the 'John Bull' trade name.

May 1962 advert:
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1961 and 1965 catalogue's:
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After-market NOS 3.8 coolant hoses (notice 'Made in England' which changed to 'Made in UK' in the late 1960's):
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John Bull branded 3.8 hose with stockinette reinforcement. This hose was used on the XK150 and all E-Type's up to early 1963 when the hose was changed to a straight design. The stockinette top hose would be concours correct for a Factory original car. The smooth finish convoluted hose would have been supplied as as a service replacement:
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John Bull branded 4.2 hose (notice they no longer use the external stockinette):
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Avon Rubber Co and Alfred Roberts Ltd were also listed as suppliers of water hoses to Jaguar during E-Type production.
Last edited by Heuer on Thu Jan 01, 2015 7:21 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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#98

Post by Heuer » Sat Sep 06, 2014 2:28 pm

Interior Mirror - FHC

The FHC interior mirror assembly #C18342 was supplied by Lucas and bears no part number. The same mirror was used on the Mk2 and the Mk10:
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The 3.8 SPC says that from car numbers 861057/888067 (~Feb 1963) the #C18342 mirror was replaced by part #C20697, the same style as subsequently used on the 4.2 cars with a two part base adjustable for height:
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There seems to be a conflict as Lucas mirror assembly 62572/A-608 (Jaguar #C18342) is pictured in both the 1961 and 1965 Lucas-Jaguar parts catalogue's as follows:
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The June 1963 3.8 SPC says (notice the 'A' on the diagram suggesting it is a revision):
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So it seems the SPC has a typo :shock: as the "(62572/A-608)" text has been added under the wrong part number. The Model 608 mirror is pictured in the 4.2 SPC:
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It was a generic item and was not specific to Jaguar e.g. vehicle unknown:
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Interior Mirror - OTS

The OTS dipping mirror was made by Winguard (M.A.) Ltd of Chichester, Sussex who supplied a wide range of car accessories to car makers and the public. The company was acquired by Britax in 1978
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It was a generic item used up until the end of S2 production and was not specific to Jaguar e.g:
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Last edited by Heuer on Fri Mar 13, 2015 5:54 pm, edited 12 times in total.
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#99

Post by Heuer » Wed Sep 10, 2014 10:05 am

Fan Relay

Up to car numbers #850723/861186, about May 1963, and #878020/886748, about August 1962, a Lucas relay 33232/A-6.RA (C18122) was used to control the radiator fan motor via the header tank Otter switch. It was then deleted leaving the otter switch to carry the full switched load from the Lucas 3GM motor which probably contributed to premature failure of the switch and complaints of over-heating.
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For owners of later cars it is probably worth fitting a 6RA relay or a modern equivalent hidden from sight if necessary. The four terminal 6RA fan motor relay (Lucas part 33209, Jaguar part C17338) is not the same as the 6RA horn relay (three terminals).
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Last edited by Heuer on Mon Oct 13, 2014 5:36 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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#100

Post by Heuer » Mon Sep 15, 2014 4:59 pm

Hardtop Mounting Bracket

The mounting brackets #BD23760/BD23761 were chrome plated and affixed to the body using two large countersunk set screws with shake-proof washers.
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Many people do not realise that in addition there was a cheese head set screw #BD20092/2 which went from the door seal channel into the UNF 12-28 threaded hole in the back of the bracket pulling the top tight against the body. Reproduction brackets do not have the threaded hole and drilling one in that position is very difficult because of the chrome plate. The top set-screws are usually missing on restored cars!
Image
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