FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Talk about the E-Type Series 1
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#261 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by Heuer » Fri Aug 23, 2019 3:03 pm

I have rolled the earlier post by Geoff Green, details observed by Ian Howe and some of my own research into a single post. Let me know if anyone has more information or edits are required.

Brake Fluid Filler Caps

Filler Cap and Level Indicator for Brake Fluid Reservoir were made by two manufacturers - Sovy Ltd and Lockheed.

Lockheed
These were large black caps marked 'NIVOCODE', 'Lockheed' and some French descriptive text; the spade terminals were vertical. These were used on the first group of cars approximating the outside bonnet lock production with the highest car found so far 875190. The level sensor consists of a float inside a round aluminium cover and were also used on the Jaguar Mk 1 and 2 saloons. Unlike the Sovy caps the wires should be removed before the cap was unscrewed. Many owners did not bother which is why the wires are twisted on most cars but they should not be.

'Nivo' is French for level, 'code' is French for rule, so 'level rule'; Nivocode is not a registered trade name, merely a product range of fluid level sensors. They also made matching brake bottles in glass, 'Nivoclair' ('clair' = clear), which regrettably Jaguar decided not to use :banghead:
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The August 1961 SPC illustrates the Nivocode sensors - C18197 'Filler Cap and Level Indicator':
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E/122/1 Owners Handbook (note wires are not twisted):
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Note the corrosion caused by water in the brake fluid:
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Plastic float:
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9600 HP with Nivocode sensors March 1961:
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SOVY (U.K.) Ltd 54 Park Lane. Croydon, Surrey

From sometime in August 1961 a revised Sovy design consisting of a multi piece cap with the top of black plastic having horizontal terminals and an attached aluminium screw cap was introduced for production. The design allowed the cap to be unscrewed from the bottle without the need to disconnect the wires. The Patent for the Sovy 'Liquid Level Indicator' was filed on 24th October 1959, revised on 9th May 1961 by Eric Bernard Aird Marsh and granted on 10th April 1963. SOVY (U.K.) Ltd continued to supply Jaguar through the Series 3 E Type and supplied other automotive manufacturers like Aston Martin, Rover, etc. SNG Barratt purchased SOVY U.K. in 1990 and continues to build the filler cap and level indicator.
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The early pre-production cars were fitted with a Sovy black cap sensor which had no identification markings as they were themselves prototypes. They were constructed differently to the later sensors and quite crude:
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Jaguar (Belgium) photo of 77 RW during the demonstration runs at Geneva March 1961 using black Sovy unmarked caps:
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9600 HP during very early testing with unmarked Sovy sensors:
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More than one very early production car (e.g. 875039) have been observed with the Sovy unmarked caps and left the Factory with them fitted. As these early sensors were pre-production they could not have been in-service replacements.

From sometime in August 1961 the Factory stopped using Lockheed NIVOCODE and started fitting Sovy sensors of a modified design. These had black caps with 'Sovy' and 'Made in England' markings as seen on on 860058 built in November 1961:
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Another November 1961 car:
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This style of sensor continued to be fitted until July 1962 when the square bottles were introduced.

NIVOCODE and Sovy sensor comparison:
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The black cap changed to a white cap when the bottles were changed from round to square in July 1962.
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The black caps are still produced with the Patent numbers added:
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In March 1963 a new style of sensor was introduced in an attempt to avoid water ingress. These had a push fit sealing knob (easily lost!):
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The new waterproof caps. Note Patent Pending imprint but the patent number does not exist:
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In October 1963 a Service Bulletin was issued with advice on an in-service modification:
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In January 1964 protective rubber caps were introduced in a further attempt to waterproof the sensors
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Dispersed throughout all series of production red coloured caps have been observed. These are original Sovy and frequently used on Lotus's however as many sensors were replaced in service (the aluminium parts corroded due to water in the brake fluid) it is difficult to know whether they were Factory fitted. All the red caps I have seen have the Patent number so, if Factory fitted, mid 1962 until March 1963 when the waterproofed versions with the push on cap were used. My guess is the red caps were in service replacements rather than Factory fit given their spread over all Series cars.
Image

Factory Fit timeline (for concours):

Prototype and pre-production cars - either Sovy unmarked black cap or Lockheed NIVOCODE
First ~500 cars up to August 1961 - Lockheed NIVOCODE sensors as illustrated in the August 1961 J.30 SPC
August 1961 to July 1962 - black cap Sovy sensors with 'Sovy and 'Made in England' imprint
July 1962 to March 1963 - white cap Sovy sensors with 'Sovy and 'Made in England' and maybe 'Patent applied for' imprint
April 1963 onwards - white cap Sovy sensors with Patent numbers and push fit waterproof caps
January 1964 onwards - protective rubber caps, which could be retrofitted to earlier cars.

Trivia: A report by Norman Dewis on the Geneva show demo cars had this to say: "Brake fluid leaking from reservoir bottles, suggest close inspection of fluid bottles for leaks".

The Patent: Once a Patent is filed (in the case of Sovy - 9 May 1961) the owner can use the words 'Patent Pending' or 'Patent applied for'; this phrasing is converted to the Patent Number once it is issued (in the case of Sovy - 10 April 1963). So any cap produced with the Patent numbers should have been after April 1963 yet they seem to have been made some 10 months earlier! The waterproof cap of March 1963 have 'Patent Pending' on them but the quoted Patent number does not exist; either it was withdrawn or the application was never filed. They seem to have been playing free and loose with the letter of Patent law. :shrug:
David Jones
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#262 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by MarekH » Fri Aug 23, 2019 3:30 pm

Is it even representative to include a factory demonstrator in this section? The car being quoted clearly had different reservoir caps at different times, a different engine by the sounds of it, different side steering wheel and heavens knows how many other changes in specification, so it hardly helps nail down what was fitted by the factory to production cars. If anything, it somewhat muddies the waters in this respect.

Surely the point of this thread is to look at cars that haven't been altered?

kind regards
Marek

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#263 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by Heuer » Fri Aug 23, 2019 4:12 pm

Yes, it is a 'Factory Fit' thread and it appears Jaguar were testing the Sovy prototype sensors which were, for obvious reasons, unmarked. The design was changed based on the feedback but in the meantime NOVICODE sensors were fitted to both the E-Type and Mk2. However a few very original early cars (two digit VIN) have been observed with the unmarked caps fitted from the Factory. As the caps were never released in the wild they cannot be after-market and all evidence points to them being original fit.

These are observations and the only hard facts we have are the drawings of the NOVICODE sensors in the J.30 SPC and the Owners Handbook. So from a documented originality point of view (e.g. concours) we must say all the cars up to around August 1961 should have had the NOVICODE sensors.

I included the development history to avoid having to explain to owners who say "but my car is different"!
David Jones
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#264 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by Ian Howe » Fri Aug 23, 2019 8:43 pm

Hi David

Thanks for the summation and balanced views.

Ian

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#265 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by Ian Howe » Wed Oct 30, 2019 8:11 am

Boot Boards aka 'Cover Assemblies'

The early (no idea for how long) Cover Assembly over the Petrol Tank did not have the rubber buffers (BD4321 x 3) in the support strip as found on later cars.

Early floorboard assembly showing original support strip and later painted strip:
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Detail of the two support strips, early strip still attached to floorboard:
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The strips were part of the 'cover assembly' and do not have a part number. The cover assembly was held in place using Parker- Kalon screws and special washers (see post #152).

Ian

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#266 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by Heuer » Mon Dec 09, 2019 3:58 pm

Exhaust System

The 3.8 exhaust system was changed several times during production to make in service fitting easier and to reduce noise. The whole system was mild steel painted semi matt black as a rust preventative as can be seen in this early photo taken at the Factory. The mufflers were chrome plated. Jaguar records show the down pipes and silencers cost them £2.15.6d whilst the tail pipes and mufflers cost £4.2.0d.
Image

Later in production the silencers alone were given an aluminised finish.

Before continuing it is worth defining the various parts of the system, using Jaguar terminology:
Image

A. Front and rear down pipe assemblies from manifold to silencer
B. Clip, securing down pipes to silencers x2
C. Twin Silencer assembly (these would be called ‘mufflers’ in the USA)
D. Rubber mounting for suspension of silencers to body x4
E. Clip securing tail pipes to silencers x2
F. Exhaust tail pipe assembly
G. Rubber mounting for suspension of tail pipes to body; Bracket for fixing of rubber mounting to boot
H. Left and right Muffler assemblies (these would be called ‘resonators’ in the USA)

The silencers, tail pipes and mufflers came as separate items with some spot welding required:
Image
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The first changes to the system were introduced in November 1961 (850179/860012/875608/885059) when the method of joining the tail pipes and mounting the mufflers to the body was revised. The new parts could be retrofitted to earlier cars provided all listed parts were used.
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NOS tail pipes showing original black heat resistant paint:
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In October 1963 (850755/861271/879990/889096) a new twin silencer was introduced which was baffled, whereas the earlier silencers were straight through. These reduced noise. To compensate the mufflers were revised with less effective sound absorption. The new silencers could be retro-fitted to earlier cars provided the rubber mountings were also updated along with the other parts listed. Jaguar stated the new mufflers should only be paired with the new silencers and not used with the earlier version.
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In August 1964 (850897/861697/881635/890664) the twin silencer assembly was given an aluminised steel casing. All other pipes and fittings were painted matt black.
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Notes:

1. There is an apocryphal tale the front down pipe was painted black and the rear down pipe painted silver to make recognition/fitting easier at the Factory. There is no evidence to support this story and I can't think Mr Arthur Whittaker, Jaguar's Chief Buyer, would have countenanced such a cost when a crayon mark would suffice! The whole mild steel system was painted heat resistant semi matt black which was standard industry practice at the time. The silencers were eventually given extra rust protection with aluminised steel casing.

2. The early silencers were a straight through design as were the mufflers. The silencers were changed to a baffle design after noise 'boom' complaints from customers. The mufflers were then modified with less effective sound absorption to maintain the sporty sound but produced at the rear of the car rather than under the passenger compartment.

3. Aluminised steel used for the later silencers is steel that has been hot-dip coated on both sides with aluminium-silicon alloy producing a material with a unique combination of properties possessed neither by steel nor by aluminium alone. Aluminised steel is more resistant to corrosion.

3. I can find no record of which company manufactured the exhaust system for Jaguar. CE LAST (Silencers) Bolton Ltd were a major manufacturer at the time as were Servais Silencers of Cricklewood and Northampton who specialised in straight through systems and supplied Aston Martin.
Image

My guess is Servais supplied them as they specialised in straight through silencers and auxiliary silencers (the E-Type mufflers).
David Jones
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#267 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by richard btype » Mon Dec 09, 2019 9:25 pm

I wonder whether Mr Arthur Whittaker could have possibly realised how he would receive such infamy?!

Do any images of him survive I wonder...
Chassis no: 860403
DOM - 11th April 1962

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#268 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by Heuer » Tue Dec 10, 2019 10:50 am

Image

Arthur 'Ticker' Whittaker biography here: https://www.jaguarheritage.com/jaguar-h ... whittaker/

He was not alone though as Harry Teather was the Purchasing Manager and Materials Manager eventually becoming Executive Director Purchasing in 1966. He retired in 1973, the longest serving Jaguar employee after fifty years of service. A business colleague asked him “To what do you attribute the success of your career, Mr Teather?”. Harry replied, quite simply, “I was hitched to a star”, which neatly sums it up.
Image
https://www.jaguarheritage.com/jaguar-h ... y-teather/
David Jones
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#269 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by Tom W » Wed Dec 11, 2019 5:38 pm

Jaguar Classic produced their exhaust from original drawings. That system has one silver and one black down pipe, so one can assume there is some original evidence to support this.

https://parts.jaguarlandroverclassic.co ... introduced

Interestingly, on your photo of the underside of the car in production, the lower wishbones look to be black, rather than cad plated. What do we know about this?
Tom
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#270 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by bopperd » Wed Dec 11, 2019 6:12 pm

Ian Trapp and I discussed this when he was here looking at my car. He said that while there appeared to be no documentation of the change from black to cad, speculation was that it was only the first hundred or so cars that had black wishbones.
Dave Schinbeckler
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#271 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by poofacio » Wed Dec 11, 2019 11:15 pm

I've owned 5 of the first 91 RHD cars, they all had black wishbones if that helps!
61 RHD OBL DHC
61 flat floor DHC
61 FHC
63 FHC
66 FHC (QUAD LIGHTS)

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#272 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by ysmalkie » Wed Dec 11, 2019 11:30 pm

Looking at the photo, also the wheel arch mudshield panels are body colour?

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#273 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by peters3103 » Thu Dec 12, 2019 6:25 am

Tom W wrote:
Wed Dec 11, 2019 5:38 pm
Jaguar Classic produced their exhaust from original drawings. That system has one silver and one black down pipe, so one can assume there is some original evidence to support this.

https://parts.jaguarlandroverclassic.co ... introduced

Interestingly, on your photo of the underside of the car in production, the lower wishbones look to be black, rather than cad plated. What do we know about this?
I note the Jaguar Classic tail pipe assembly is in silver rather than black as originally specified.
Pete
61 E-Type FHC Opalescent Golden Sand
99 XKR FHC Pacific Blue - sold December 2022
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#274 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by Heuer » Thu Dec 12, 2019 11:20 am

Tom W wrote:
Wed Dec 11, 2019 5:38 pm
Jaguar Classic produced their exhaust from original drawings. That system has one silver and one black down pipe, so one can assume there is some original evidence to support this.
The Jaguar Classic exhaust has aluminised pipes and silencers so whilst practical, not to original period specification and the copy appears to be based on the October 1961 version.
Image

We cannot hold it up as a sterling example of originality! Unless someone can come up with supporting documentation we must go with the Factory production line photo which shows the system as being black. My other reasoning is:

1. The SPC drawings (the draughtsmen drew what they saw) do not illustrate a coded difference in the down pipes
2. There is no mention of a down pipe 'polarity' marking in the Spare Parts Catalogue, Spare Parts Bulletins, Service Bulletins, Service Manual or Owners Manual
3. No other handed parts on the car were so overtly marked
4. It would serve no purpose at the Factory as the fitters were experienced
5. The unacceptable added cost of production when the bought-in price for down pipes and silencers was £2.15.6d - a sticker or the ubiquitous yellow crayon mark would have sufficed
6. It would have caused confusion at Service Centres and with customers - "Why don't my down pipes match? It looks terrible"!
7. Books devoted to originality by Thomas Haddock, Mike Mueller. Anders Clausager and Philip Porter make no mention of the coded down pipes
8. That photo says it all
Tom W wrote:
Wed Dec 11, 2019 5:38 pm
the lower wishbones look to be black, rather than cad plated. What do we know about this?
Yes, the early cars had black painted suspension components. We do not know the date when this changed to Cadmium plating.
ysmalkie wrote:
Wed Dec 11, 2019 11:30 pm
Looking at the photo, also the wheel arch mudshield panels are body colour?
I think it is a black car.
David Jones
S1 OTS OSB; S1 FHC ODB

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#275 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by ysmalkie » Tue Jan 14, 2020 3:50 pm

So, I decided to help out a bit and write a piece on the back glass (glass in boot lid). David, please feel free to edit as you wish.

Chronologically:
1. Start of e-type production:
BD19362 GLASS IN BOOT LID, clear

2. April/May '62, accodring to SPB P.56:
"Electrically heated backlight, which prevent misting or frosting of' the glass are available from Jaguar Spares Division when specially ordered:"
BD21942 BACKLIGHT(CLEAR GLASS)
BD22742 BACKLIGHT("SUNDYM"GLASS)

Image

Image


3. June '62, according to SPB P.60, starting from chassis 860479 and subs. & 886014 and subs.:
"'E1 type Fixed Head Coupe models bearing the above and subsequent chassis numbers incorporate numerous modified Body Panels. The use of the new Panel necessitate alterations to various Trim Panels and Casings."


This meant that since the boot lid was modified, the glass had to be modified, too, and the following new glass versions were to be used
BD19650 GLASS IN BOOT LID
BD22740 GLASS IN BOOT LID (CLEAR GLASS), heated
BD22744 GLASS IN BOOT LID ("SUNDYM" GLASS), heated


Image

Image


The glass changed dimensionally as follows:

Image

NOTE - TOP and BOTTOM is reversed.
I checked my glass from '63 and the A=815mm, so somewhere in the middle..
It would be interesting to get some real measurements from early glass.

LOGOS

The SUNDYM glass had a special logo. Here is a sample from '62 S1 Chassis 888330 manufactured March 1963.
Logo dated from Q4 '62:

Image

Although the logo is from Q4, I do not think it was different in Q2.

Starting from '63, logo changed to have TRIPLEX printed in a thicker font:

Image


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#276 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by Heuer » Thu Sep 24, 2020 4:03 pm

Strikes

Image

It is easy to overlook the impact of social unrest in the UK during E-Type production. Strikes were regular occurrences both at Jaguar and their suppliers which puts into perspective the "we used what we had to hand" comments from former employees. I thought it would be appropriate to document these disruptions from News reports during the first couple of years of S1 production.

Jaguar had one hundred main suppliers. Tyres from Dunlop, electrical equipment from Joseph Lucas. Glass from Triplex Holdings (a public limb of the Pilkington private empire). Instruments from S. Smith & Sons, Carburettors from S.U., a B.M.C subsidiary. Prop shafts from Hardy Spicer, which are part of Birfield. Door handles and bumpers from Wilmot Breeden. Radiators from Marston Excelsior of Leeds, an I.C.I subsidiary. Automotive Products, of Leamington, who made Borg and Beck clutches and Lockheed brakes. Birfield's Hardy-Spicer, Associated Engineering and innumerable subsidiaries of G.K.N. Jaguar depended on firms like these and above all it depended on their labour relations.

Jaguar was precariously exposed if anything went wrong at any of its myriad suppliers.

April 1961
The Jaguar car works at Coventry were at a standstill all day today because of a strike of 120 press shop men over new methods of payment for jobs. During the day the firm announced that they were prepared to pay the same money that the men had received previously and the men voted for an immediate return.
The strike led to 4,500 day shift workers being sent home. Tonight production was getting back to normal. When the strike began a union spokesman said that rate fixers had refused to authorize payment on previous terms. "The firm want to alter the method of payment in the press shop. Discussions on this between stewards and the works manager took place last week and a promise was made."

29 May 1961
Demand for the new E-type Jaguar has been so great that the company has had to step up production by 50 per cent; extra night shifts are being worked at Coventry in an attempt to meet this demand. A target of 150 E-type Jaguars a week has been set and it is hoped to reach this target towards the end of the autumn. Jaguar's current car production, excluding the E-type, is running at about 525 a week. About 65 per cent of total production goes for export of which about 33 per cent goes to the North American markets.

22 June 1961
More car workers were without work yesterday because of the Cricklewood strike of car instrument workers at Smiths, which seems likely to continue at least until Monday afternoon when the strikers meet again. Yesterday the strikers decided to continue the stoppage. Jaguars, who laid off 650 men yesterday, said that to "keep faith" with home customers expecting delivery of cars for the holidays they were making arrangements for models to be fitted with kilometre speedometers normally used only a vehicles for export. These will have overlays bearing m.p.h. conversions and will be replaced by the company when the strike is over.

30 June 1961
The 2,000 workers at Smith's Motor Accessories at Cricklewood, N.W.. were back at work yesterday after their two-week unofficial strike over a pay claim. Arrangements were made for the return to work of car workers made idle by the strike. Jaguar employees at Coventry will return today.

31 August 1961
Car workers in the Midlands are now beginning to be laid off as a result of the month-old strike of 21 toolsetters at the Birmingham factory of S.U. Carburettors. Ltd. On Friday 600 workers at the Jaguar Plant at Coventry will lose a day's work because of the dispute. About 1,000 men will not report for work at the Jaguar works in Coventry tomorrow and 950 will be laid off on Monday.

13 September 1961
Production in the car industry was not back to normal at Birmingham yesterday, although the dispute which upset supplies of SU carburettors ended last week. Jaguar Cars, Coventry, were working normally yesterday, but 950 employees will be laid off there today. The strike of toolsetters at the S.U. Carburettors works over an inter-union dispute ended on Thursday, when the men returned to work while talks took place.

23 October 1961
Trade union assurances of co-operation for Jaguar Cars Ltd., of Coventry, in fulfilling the requirements of the £22,500,000 order placed by their North American distributors, have been given this weekend. Jaguars have exactly 12 months to build and deliver over 10,000 cars. and in doing so they must strictly comply with the delivery dates specified. Labour disputes could damage the company's position.

This weekend, Mr D. Fairbairn. district secretary of the Confederation of Shipbuilding and Engineering Unions, said of the Jaguar order: "All the Jaguar work-people will realize the importance of getting orders such as the company has obtained and there is no doubt that every cooperation will be forthcoming to see that as many cars as possible can be produced in the shortest possible time, and with the same high quality of workmanship. Every effort will be made so that even more orders can be obtained by the company."

Jaguar production facilities have been undergoing major changes during the past few weeks which will make it possible for them to meet this order which consists of 40 per cent of the new Jaguar Mark 10 model, 40 per cent E type and 20 per cent 3.8 litre Mark 2 saloons. Trouble from the Jaguar work-people themselves appears unlikely, but what Jaguars have to fear most is strike trouble at plants of their suppliers.

4 November 1961
Thirteen days after landing a dollar- earning order worth £22,500,000 Jaguar Cars at Coventry were affected by a lightning strike today. The Coventry factory of Jaguar Cars resumed normal production today with the return of 150 strikers from the trim shop who had walked out yesterday, causing 500 other workers to be laid off. They went back after talks with their union officials. They had said that their piecework earnings had gone down through excessive waiting for work after a production change-over concerning two models.

8 January 1962
Jaguar Cars, of Coventry, laid off 800 employees yesterday because of absenteeism in the supply department. A number of workers were away with influenza and other illnesses. Those laid off were asked to report today as usual in the hope that the position will have improved. The assembly of the Jaguar E and Mark 2 cars stopped.

8 February 1962
A lightening strike by 4,800 men stopped the Jaguar car plant at Coventry yesterday — and put a £22,500,000 export order in danger. American dealers who placed the order for 10,000 cars last October insisted that if delivery dates were not met they would cancel it. A company spokesman said yesterday that delivery dates "had reached a critical stage." The strike began when 4,500 men walked out because two men worked during the one-day national engineering stoppage on Monday. Last night, the 300 nightshift men did not report for work. After a meeting yesterday, shop stewards and union officials said: “The shop stewards feel these two men should be sacked.”

9 February 1962
Refusal by managements either to sack or suspend men who worked during Monday 's national engineering strike resulted in more factories closing yesterday. At Jaguar 's Coventry factory 4,500 production workers held a mass meeting and accepted a shop steward's advice to stay out until the firm dismisses two union men who worked on Monday.

The next meeting of the strikers has been announced for Tuesday, which means that even if the men decided to return to work then it would be impossible to resume full production until the following day. Jaguar's would thus have lost six days' production : the equivalent of about 650 to 700 cars. An American export order worth £22.5 millions, carries cancellation clauses if delivery is not made within a year of its placing at the Motor Show. A spokesman for the company said: "We are not in a position to dismiss these two men. What have they done against the company? This is a domestic matter for the union concerned and a settlement of this issue lies entirely in their hands. Today's decision at the mass meeting constituted the first request for the dismissal of the men that has been made to the management."

14 February 1962
Flattered by the congratulations of four local trade union officials, Jaguar car workers today voted to end the dispute in which 4,500 of them have been on strike. The majority in favour of returning to work tomorrow morning was enormous. Yesterday afternoon a negotiating committee of shop stewards agreed with the management that the two men who worked at Jaguars during the engineering strike on February 5 should not go to work for a fortnight while the union dealt with the matter. Yesterday evening the Jaguar branch of the Transport and General Workers' Union agreed that the men should each be fined £5. It is said to be entirely a happy coincidence that the two men themselves offered to be suspended from work for two weeks without pay.

15 February 1962
Jaguars tonight laid off 800 of the 4,500 returning strikers because of "considerable dislocation caused by the stoppage, particularly in the supply departments". The 800 were stood off until next Monday. Another 300 might have to be laid off during Friday, the firm said. The Jaguar strike, which lasted a week, was over the firm's refusal to dismiss two men who worked during the national one- day engineering stoppage on February 5.

17 February 1962
Some 1,100 of the 4,500 Jaguar workers in Coventry who returned to work on Wednesday alter a week long strike, were idle again yesterday. They have been laid off until Monday because of production dislocation caused by the strike.

28 February 1962
Jaguar car production is almost back to the normal 530 cars a week. The recent seven-day strike-at the height of work on a £22,500,000 United States export order-cost the company nearly £1m. They will be unable to recoup the loss of 600 Mark Ten, Mark II and E type Jaguars.

3 March 1962
Arrangements are complete for the second one-day token stoppage in engineering and shipbuilding on Monday. Mr H. G. Barratt, general secretary of the Confederation of Shipbuilding and Engineering Unions, said yesterday that he expected it to be as successful as the first one, which was held on February 5 in protest against the rejection of pay and hours claims. The employers reported an 80 per cent strike in engineering and an almost total stoppage in shipbuilding Several engineering firms have already announced that they will close. At the Jaguar factory yesterday notices were posted requesting manual workers not to report for work. The company are anxious to avoid a repetition of their experience last time, when, because two men worked, a week-long strike developed.

10 May 1962
Production stopped at the Coventry factory of Jaguar Cars yesterday when 700 day workers walked out on strike protesting over the progress on a wage claim associated with the firm's production bonus scheme. Some 2,500 other production workers had to be sent home. The strikers inspectors, store-keepers, and material handlers-are expected to return today.

18 May 1962
About 850 assembly workers at the Coventry factory of Jaguar Cars Ltd. were sent home yesterday after a walk-out by 400 trim shop employees over a piecework pav dispute. Those sent home were told not to report back until Tuesday because of the shortage of supplies. The strikers, members of the National Union of Vehicle Builders, said they would report to the factory today, but would not work until their claim was satisfactorily settled. a spokesman for Jaguar Cars Ltd., of Coventry, said at the weekend that because of four unofficial stoppages this year the company had no margin of time to spare to meet delivery deadlines.

"Should the current unofficial stoppage continue, it cannot do otherwise than result in a considerable loss of business, both at home and overseas. A successful export business depends mainly on competitive pricing and prompt delivery. These unofficial strikes are denuding Jaguar of both these vital assets." The spokesman added that not a single advantage had been gained from any of the stoppages.

8 June 1962
Car assembly was stopped at Jaguar Cars, Coventry, yesterday for the fifth time this year. The firm had to send home 750 production workers following a series of spasmodic stoppages during the week by the 400 trim shop men who recently caused seven days loss of production when they struck over a pay claim.
A spokesman for the firm, at Coventry, said last night: "We were forced to send them home because of a spate of unofficial strikes by 400 trim shop workers over piecework rates." The strikes, which have lasted for between one and two hours, are in defiance of union officials."

1 August 1962
For the sixth time this year production has been disrupted by an unofficial stoppage at Jaguar Cars Ltd., Coventry. At luncheon time today 1,300 men were sent home after 50 internal transport drivers walked out because of a revised bonus scheme. Those laid off, a day after their annual fortnight's holiday, were told to report back tomorrow morning, when the working position will be reviewed. Management said that the strikers acted against the advice and instructions of their shop stewards and before their grievance could be discussed through the usual channels of negotiation.

14 August 1962
Production of the dollar-earning E- type Jaguar cars was halted at the Coventry factory today when 62 men walked out. The strikers, who are employed on the pre-mount and body assembly work, object to the company's plan to increase the number of workers on these jobs and say that too many extra men there will have an adverse effect on their earnings.

Because of the stoppage about 140 other workers engaged on the E-type assembly were laid off. They were told to report back tomorrow in the hope that the strikers would have returned. An official of the firm said that the strikers, members of the National Union of Vehicle Builders, were told before the walkout that if the operation of the new system meant that they would lose money the matter would be re-examined. The walk- out was against the advice of the shop stewards. The extra labour was required in the assembly section to step up production to meet increased demand for the model.

27 September 1962
Thirteen hundred production workers at Jaguar Cars Ltd., Coventry, were sent home yesterday after an unofficial one-day token strike by 20 men in the automatic chrome plating plant. The strikers have demanded a change in their methods and rate of pay. The company said they had made several offers during constitutional procedural discussions each of which was rejected. A meeting on Tuesday had been adjourned.

2 October 1962
Six thousand men went on strike at the factory of Jaguar Cars Ltd here today and production was stopped completely. Trouble began after the firm's decision to dismiss a man (Ronald Rowe) employed in the oil cleaning shop after an alleged assault on a foreman (Bill Whetstone). The joint shop stewards committee recommended the strike because no action was taken against the foreman. While the stewards were meeting, trouble broke out on the Mark X assembly line, where men objected to the transfer of 20 workers from the Mark 2 line to increase track speeds. A company official said the firm was insistent that quality production could be maintained only if these men were transferred to the line. A mass meeting of the workers has been called for tomorrow.

3 October 1962
A mass meeting today of the 6,000 employees of Jaguar Cars, Ltd., Coventry, whose strike action yesterday brought car assembly to a standstill, voted for a return to work beginning with the night shift tonight. A company official said later: "A partial return to work will take place tomorrow, but no car production will be possible, owing to a shortage of chrome- plated parts, following the unofficial strike in the plating department on Wednesday and the employment of go-slow tactics on Thursday and Friday of last week."

8 October 1962
The three-day-old strike by 300 Coventry car delivery drivers which threatened production at the city's three main factories-Rootes, Jaguar, and Standard- Triumph International-is over. At a special meeting today the car delivery men and women agreed to return to work tomorrow. Members of the Transport and General Workers' Union, they had been protesting over the collection of cars in Coventry for delivery to all parts of the country by firms which had no agreement on pay and conditions with their union.

23 October 1962
Normal production was resumed at Burman and Sons, a car components factory at King's Norton , Birmingham, yesterday, with the return of 800 workers, who voted on Friday to end their four-day strike. At Jaguar's, of Coventry, 1,500 men laid off on Friday as a result of the Burman strike were also back at work yesterday.

12 January 1963
The three-week-old American dock strike has made workers at Jaguar Cars, Coventry, idle, and more car firms may have to take similar action because of the build-up in shipments. The men affected are nearly all the 230 assembly track workers on the Jaguar E type car, one of Britain's biggest dollar earners. They have been told to report back on Tuesday. It was announced yesterday that the car's price in the United States would be cut by about £143 for the fixed- head coupe and about £107 for the open seater because of increasing American competition and the company's determination to remain in the forefront-of' British car firms. The strike has meant that no car shipments are being unloaded along the United States eastern seaboard. This has caused a heavy build-up at the Coventry factory of cars intended for the United States.

7 February 1963
Production was halted when about 850 workers, most of the labour force, remained idle at the S.U. carburettor factory, which supplies carburettors and fuel pumps for Jaguar and most B.M.C. models. The men are striking in protest against the suspension of a tool- room worker. He is due to resume work tomorrow, and the strike is expected to end.

3 May 1963
Two dozen women yesterday decided it was too cold for work in the Jaguar car factory.

And as a result 650 men workers had to be sent home and £170,000 worth of production was lost. "It was," said a Jaguar official, "a highly expensive bit of nonsense." He added, at the factory in Coventry: "The heating was switched off last week when temperatures generally generally were above the 60 degree minimum laid down by the Factory Acts. This morning the factory temperature was 65 degrees. A dozen trim shop women making car seats work. Later they were joined by another dozen." The official went on: "We offered to switch on the heating, but explained it would take several hours before there would be any noticeable effect. The women still refused to start work. Finally we had to stop four production tracks affected by the trim shop. But we believe everything will be all right tomorrow. We'll be ready to switch on the heating immediately."

28 May 1963
Two Coventry factories, Jaguar Cars, Ltd. and Standard-Triumph International, Ltd., both big dollar earners with bulging order books, were at a standstill today with over 10,000 workers on strike or thrown idle because of pay disputes. At Jaguar Cars, 750 key workers who handle material and inspect components went on strike today complaining of lack of progress in introducing an individual incentive bonus scheme. The rest of the firm's 3,500 labour force had to be laid off, and they have been asked to report back on Wednesday morning to await the outcome of a meeting by the strikers the same morning. A spokesman for Jaguar Cars said: "The walk-out was against the advice of their shop stewards. The bonus scheme was put forward by the company and agreed with unions and employees. It means greater remuneration for greater efforts by the day workers, and it was accepted that it would take time to introduce."

28 June 1963
Mr Harry Adey, industrial relations manager at Jaguar Cars Ltd., Coventry, who was recently a shop steward, was today involved in a dispute concerning his former workmates which resulted in 1,000 men being laid off. Sixty sheet metal workers who were colleagues of Mr Adey until his appointment two weeks ago complained that the company was guilty of "unconstitutional behaviour ". The complaint arose when Mr Adey was investigating a sheet metal union request that more of its members might be employed at the factory. The men began work later than usual today after a meeting and because of this there was a shortage of components which resulted in the lay-off in assembly sections of all models. During the day there were discussions between union officials and management representatives, who included Mr Adey. The workers who were laid off were told to report back to work tomorrow morning.

2 July 1963
Production was resumed tonight at Jaguar Cars Ltd., Coventry, after a decision earlier in the day to return to work by 200 striking sheet metal workers. Some of the men returned tonight but the bulk will resume tomorrow. Local union officials will now ask their national officer to take the members grievances to the employers federation. Their protest was over a management survey of labour strength about which they said they should have been consulted first.

26 August 1963
About 3,000 Jaguar workers in Coventry may be sent home when they report for work tomorrow morning. The Browns Lane assembly plant has been idle since Thursday because of a strike by 20 bodyshop men who claim that the company fixed a pay rate for waiting time between jobs without consultation. Some 2,000 assembly workers supported the body-shop men and others had to be laid off. The company denied the allegation and repeated this weekend the warning that they would not negotiate until there was a return to work. The strikers say they want talks to start before they return. Private talks were taking place over the weekend between shop stewards and trade union officials and the strikers will meet early tomorrow morning.

Meanwhile. Jaguar Cars have reported that final sales figures for the financial year ended July 31 showed that it was a record year for Jaguar exports. The biggest advance in sales was to Europe where an increase of 45 per cent was achieved over the previous record year of 1960-61. There was an increase of 106 per cent in exports to the Common Market and one of 32 per cent in exports to the Efta countries.

6 September 1963
Half the Midlands car industry is threatened by the four-day-old strike of 450 Coventry car delivery drivers. Jaguars announced tonight there would be no work for 2,350 employees tomorrow and on Monday. The dispute concerns the increased employment of part-time delivery drivers and particularly drivers employed by a new firm which is outside the car delivery employers' association. The strikers claim that full-time car delivery men have been made redundant because of the employment of part-timers.
David Jones
S1 OTS OSB; S1 FHC ODB

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#277 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by ysmalkie » Fri Nov 06, 2020 5:36 pm

Distance Pieces, Spacer Collars, etc.

With great help from Ian Howe, I have put together a table with various spacers, distance pieces, etc. A lot of suppliers do not quite supply right dimensions or do not supply the part at all:

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C2155 Distance piece for the C19890 Clip retaining sparking plug leads
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C11583  Distance piece under dipstick retaining Clip, on Manifold nut.
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C18307  Distance piece for dynamo adjusting link C18850 (late 3.8, From engine R1845 onwards)
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C18283 Distance collar for the radiator rubber mounting pads
C8976 Distance collar for the header tank bracket rubber mounting pads
(Ian is 90% sure the taller collar is for the radiator.)
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The rubber pad C8975 current supplied by the usual suppliers seems to be very tall for these distance collars as it compresses them way too much.

C16766 Distance Piece, under forward end of Tie Bars for the radiator
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C15712 Upper Distance Piece, between Cowl and Tie Bars
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BD541/9 Lower Distance Piece, between Cowl and brackets under Radiator Block
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Last edited by ysmalkie on Sat Jan 16, 2021 1:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Tadek

e-type S1 3.8 FHC - in restoration phase...
Jaguar XK120 OTS
Austin-Healey 100 BN2

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#278 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by Heuer » Fri Nov 13, 2020 11:50 am

Touch-up Paint

Every E-Type leaving the Factory was supplied with a half pint tin of paint matching the colour of the car.

Berger and Sons of Homerton, London, E9, produced paints known as Berger Paints.

1760 Louis Steigenberger (1740-1816) moved from Frankfurt to London to sell Prussian blue which was made using his own secret formula.
1766 A company had been established with Frederick Smith. Louis changed his name to Lewis Berger and married and settled in Hometon, East London. The colours he produced were sold in a shop in Cheapside, London.
1781 Partnership dissolved. '...the Partnership between Lewis Berger and Philip Thomas Hoggins, of Homerton in the County of Middlesex, Colour-manufacturers, under, the Firm of Berger and Hoggins, was this Day dissolved by mutual Consent; and that all Debts owing to the said Partnership Account are to be paid to the said Lewis Berger only...'
1785 Premises were purchased in Queen Street, Cheapside to keep in touch with the city and export trade. John and Samuel Berger, Lewis's sons ran this part of the company.
1790 By this time Berger was selling 19 different pigments, as well as black lead, sulphur, sealing wax and mustard.
1814 Lewis Berger died and his sons, John and Samuel took over the running of the business. They were succeeded by John's sons, Lewis Curwood and Capel Berrow Berger, afterwards it was run by Arthur another of Lewis's sons.
1879 Lewis Berger and Sons was incorporated. Acquired a white lead works in Sheffield
1905 The company's financial state was uncertain until W. H. Cottingham, vice-president of the American paint maker, Sherwin Williams, bought control of the company. The company built factories around the British Empire and developed colours for printing, enamels and varnishes.
1908 Made a private company
1926 Company went public
1934 29 acres of land were purchased in Chadwell Heath to build factories for manufacturing.
1937 Dope, paint and varnish manufacturers.
1939 Aircraft Industry Suppliers
1950 The company had to move from Homerton to make way for a new trunk road (that was never built).
1950's The Chadwell Heath site in Essex already supported a small factory making nitro-cellulose paints and this site was developed to accommodate new offices, paint and resin production plants, laboratories and warehouses on the site.
1957 The Homerton site was finally closed. The company was trading as Lewis Berger (Gt. Britain) Ltd.
1960 Merged with Jenson and Nicholson Ltd to become Berger, Jenson and Nicholson Ltd
1963 Motor Show exhibitor. Enamels and finishes.
1969 acquired British Paints Ltd.
1969 Taken over by Hoeschst AG, the firm retained its separate identity.
1987 After being sold to Williams Holdings it became part of Crown Paints and then finally part of the Dutch Akzo Nobel company.
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Factory photo showing toolkit, jack and paint can:
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Very few of these cans survive. This one was found by Chuck Hadley of Monocoque Metalworks in his very original unrestored 1966 OTS. It had been opened and used to touch-up parts of the car although the remaining paint seems to have leaked out:
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A smudge of paint on the base indicates the colour within:
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David Jones
S1 OTS OSB; S1 FHC ODB

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#279 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by Heuer » Tue Nov 17, 2020 4:25 pm

Bonnets

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The bonnets of early cars had four main differences to the later bonnets:

1. The mouth was smaller in height although the width was the same
2. The flanges were spot welded and wider in section
3. The power bulge had a very sharp defining edge and the valleys either side were deeper
4. The louvres were welded in and a different shape

Because of the low planned production run Jaguar did not want to spend money on body tooling. The first tools were made by hand forming 16 gauge steel panels, putting them in wet sand and pouring concrete on top. Panels were then formed by stretch pressing 20 gauge sheet over these concrete reinforced steel moulds. They wore out quickly and one of the first casualties was the definition of the bonnet power bulge - originally a very sharp crease at its perimeter then a gentle curve.

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The four main parts of the early bonnets – centre section, wings and under panel – were each made of two pieces welded together. The weld was then sanded down to produce a smooth surface. Jaguar did not use filler or lead on the bonnet. Once the panels were complete the flanges were spot welded into place and the spots were beaten with a hammer from the inside. The now proud plugs were then sanded flat.

The Mouth
The centre section mouth was shallower in height compared to the under panel. The difference in shape was all in the centre panel. The drawing office even managed to capture it:
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1961 Motor Show car:
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Restored bonnet at Monocoque Metalworks - look at that power bulge shape!:
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Early restored car with original bonnet showing the sharply defined bulge crease, deep valley's and asymmetrical mouth:
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It is almost impossible to recreate the original bonnet shape without a restorable centre section. Here is an early centre section mated to later wings. Notice the change in depth of the flange and how they do not line up:
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Flanges
The flanges were spot welded to the bonnet, a very time consuming task. The spot welds then had to be sanded resulting in the metal being thinner and this, along with the spot welded joint not being waterproof, caused rapid corrosion in less than two years.
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Also notice the attachment holes are not elongated for adjustment as in later bonnets which had the glued flanges.
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There are over 80 spot welds which need to be dressed without the aid of filler:
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The flanges on the early bonnets are larger in section compared to the bonded flanges so ungluing later ones and welding them back will not work. Along with the propensity for rust to develop under the welded flanges the problem was exacerbated by road shock which caused them to separate from the panels increasing the gap for water to enter. The outer bonnet paint surface also developed craters where the spot welds were pulled down. The wings were not as susceptible to corrosion as the flanges were vertical and moisture could run away but the centre panel flanges were horizontal so water could gather and remain.

Louvres
The louvres were a separate pressing, reinforced and welded into the bonnet. The shape of the louvres is subtly different to the later cars:
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Headlamp Flanges
The early bonnets had a very deeply pressed flange for the headlamp.
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In about October 1961 new body tools were made using zinc based Kirksite, more suitable for mass production, but not ideal. Other parts were made using a mechanical press or a rubber die press. It was after the change from the concrete reinforced moulds to Kirksite that the change in the centre section mouth occurred along with a shallowing of the valleys either side of the power bulge. The lower valance was unchanged and the bonnet mouth was now symmetrical.
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The flanges were glued on which was a far better approach resulting in ease of manufacture and less chance of rust.

Chuck Hadley of Monocoque Metalworks explains how the early bonnet was made in this video:

Many thanks to Chuck for allowing us to use some of his photos and video to illustrate this post. Worth visiting the Monocoque Metalworks site and looking at their fantastic work and many video's. They sell a huge range of body parts as well as doing restorations: https://www.monocoque-metalworks.com/main/

Trivia:

1. Kirksite (aka Zamak 2) was developed primarily as a forming tool alloy. Dies cast from Kirksite provide low-cost tooling because the alloy can be accurately cast, requiring minimal finishing. In addition, Kirksite has been used as a general purpose casting alloy for non-stressed components. Typical Uses for Kirksite are: Press dies and punches for sheet metal forming, Molds for ceramics and rubber, Injection molding and compression molding dies, tube bending dies, Mandrels for metal spinning, Low stressed - non sparking tools and repair parts.

2. There is evidence to suggest the early bonnets were slightly shorter than the revised design. This can be seen when offering later wings up to the early centre section:
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3. Arguably the bonnet is what defines the early cars as it is the only outwardly visible difference to any interested observer. Outside bonnet locks can be fitted to any bonnet but there is no economically viable way of re-creating the centre section profile.
David Jones
S1 OTS OSB; S1 FHC ODB

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#280 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by Heuer » Thu Nov 19, 2020 3:43 pm

Gear Knob C16154

The gear knob for the Moss box was a two part design made from phenolic resin. It is produced by pouring heated liquid resin into a mould and a threaded brass insert is used to allow the knob to be screwed onto the gear lever; a chromed hex nut was used to secure it in position (not the chromed cone used on the 4.2 cars!). The top of the knob is a clear dome with the shift pattern painted on which is then glued in place.
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There are some NOS examples in original packaging being offered on eBay but prices can be high.

Some of the reproductions are a good match (Moss Motors):
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Others have overly bold numbers and lines e.g.:
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Shop around to get the best match!
David Jones
S1 OTS OSB; S1 FHC ODB

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