FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Talk about the E-Type Series 1

wagstefan
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#281 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by wagstefan » Mon Dec 28, 2020 1:00 pm

Early front shock absorbers Girling NF 64054173

I've got two original early front shocks: Girling NF 64054173 and the Haddock/Mueller original guide which quotes that the original paint is supposed to be a pale grey/blue. My ones are black and I believe the colour to be original. At least definitely unchanged since 1994 but maybe related to the car's original colour: black. The car was changed to a light blue at some time in the past (most likely in the 70s/80s). But everything under the hood remained mostly original.
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Heuer
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#282 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by Heuer » Thu Dec 31, 2020 2:20 pm

I have folded posts #277 'Early Heater Box' and #278 'Very early heater blower motors' into the earlier post #164 to keep everything we know concerning these items in one place. I have also added some more content: http://forum.etypeuk.com/viewtopic.php?p=58877#p58877
David Jones
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bopperd
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#283 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by bopperd » Fri Jan 01, 2021 3:39 am

I believe the original front shocks on 875343 are black as well, but it is difficult to tell with all the rust.
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Dave Schinbeckler
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Heuer
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#284 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by Heuer » Fri Jan 29, 2021 4:39 pm

OTS Hood Rear Window

The rear window of the hood was made from Vybak plastic, a soft felexible formulation having good clarity, weather resistance and stitchable. It was produced and supplied by Bakelite Ltd.
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Original rear windows are very rare as despite the quality and UV resistance of Vybak it scratches easily and dulls over time. The plastic can be unstitched and replaced relatively easily. Vybak is still available today as it is used in automotive and marine applications. The one thing that is not replicated are the original name, numbers and care instructions embossed in the lower left corner:
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If you have an original hood the Vybak plastic can be restored and the best product to use is Meguiars Plast RX Clear Plastic Cleaner & Polish together with an orbital polisher as long as you are carful not to heat up the plastic as it will stretch!
David Jones
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wagstefan
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#285 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by wagstefan » Fri Feb 05, 2021 5:22 pm

In case someone is interested in some pics of the very early rear wheel hub carriers C 15229


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Series1 Stu
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#286 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by Series1 Stu » Thu Feb 18, 2021 8:57 am

Hi

I'm not sure about the value of this information but, with reference to post #5 of this topic and the "HEAD LAMP vs HEADLAMP" dipswitch escutcheon difference. My car, which rolled off the production line on 28th December 1962, has the HEADLAMP escutcheon so Dave's note that it changed in late 1962 is correct - they were still rolling out with the originals between Christmas and New Year!

Probably a bit of mix and match going on.

Regards

PS - I haven't been able to find any pictures of this detail in the originality and restoration books by Klausager, Porter or Barzilay. The photographs always seem to have it cropped out.
Stuart

If you can't make it work, make it complicated!

'62 FHC - Work In (slow) Progress
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wagstefan
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#287 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by wagstefan » Wed Mar 17, 2021 2:01 pm

Maybe another interesting observation from two welded louvers center sections (one supposedly from 875443 - I bought it off the then owner like 3? years ago and it shows the original colour as well as the resprayed one) and another I disassembled just a few days ago.

After putting them in a row, starting with a newer Series 1 center section, I could identify some regular and on purpose made bends in all 4 flanges of the welded louvers center sections:


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wagstefan
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#288 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by wagstefan » Wed Mar 17, 2021 2:07 pm

And one more.

The flanges on the welded louver bonnets are approx 2 mm shorter than on the other, later Series 1 bonnet (not sure, if this is a 3.8 or 4.2). But it is an original one...

And yes, the first picture is a bit misleading. But it is clear below 2.5cm and also approx 2.3cm tall.


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MarekH
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#289 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by MarekH » Thu Apr 01, 2021 9:37 am

I'm not sure a 2mm difference in flange size is an indicator of originality, especially when ought to have been measured in fractions of an inch anyway.

It does remind me of one detail previously overlooked:- the first hundred or so cars have the Sikaflex bonded in on these flanges is going from right to left and all of the subsequent ones show the little bead of goop at the other end thereafter, i.e. the caulking gun ran from left to right. This isn't as daft as it it seams. The guy on that part of the line was left handed and when Jaguar set up a proper bonnet assembly line, he moved on and was replaced by someone right handed.

kind regards
Marek

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Mich7920
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#290 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by Mich7920 » Thu Apr 01, 2021 3:58 pm

Funny anecdote !
Fortunately the robots are ambidextrous now...
Michel
1965 E Type FHC - On the road - 1963 E Type OTS - Angus Restoration
Gran Torino Sport 1975 - Renault 4cv 1956 - CItroen 15/6 1951 - CItroen Traction 1945
Citroen Coupé docteur 5Hp 1924 - Citroen B12 1926 - Torpedo Sygma 1913
Harley D. 1915 sidecar

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PeterCrespin
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#291 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by PeterCrespin » Fri Apr 02, 2021 11:55 am

An April first specimen methinks... Being left-handed but somewhat ambidextrous runs in my father’s family. ‘Seams’ I could have earned double time at Jaguar, and quadruple on holidays :-)

As to Wagstean’s point, it would be interesting to know if the extra metal was equal on both sides - indicating more generous trimming after pressing, or slightly lop-sided, indicating variable placement of the blank sheet in the press.

Alternatively, all blanks could be identical but the folding point varied fractionally on each edge. The dimension I would expect least variance would be the distance between opposing holes measured across the panel, but that would be very hard to measure accurately and consistently.
1E75339 UberLynx D-Type; 1R27190 70 FHC; 1E78478; 2001 Vanden Plas

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christopher storey
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#292 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by christopher storey » Fri Apr 02, 2021 4:55 pm

The bonnets were assembled at Abbey Panels anyway !!

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wagstefan
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#293 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by wagstefan » Sun Jun 27, 2021 7:25 am

wagstefan wrote:
Wed Mar 17, 2021 2:07 pm
And one more.

The flanges on the welded louver bonnets are approx 2 mm shorter than on the other, later Series 1 bonnet (not sure, if this is a 3.8 or 4.2). But it is an original one...

And yes, the first picture is a bit misleading. But it is clear below 2.5cm and also approx 2.3cm tall.
@Peter (as otgers might not be intereated): the flanges are wider on both sides. So the panels were of different size or a different pressing method / tool was used. David once wrote that they used concrete in the beginning. Maybe this is the reason?!

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Heuer
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#294 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by Heuer » Thu Dec 23, 2021 5:08 pm

Front and Rear Brake Cylinders
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Up until cars 850253/860022/875963/885142 (December1961) the front and rear brake cylinders were made of Malleable Iron. On all subsequent cars the brake cylinders were Cast Iron. 'C' was added to the casting to denote the later cast iron cylinders. Malleable Iron starts out as Cast Iron but is heat treated (annealed) which gives it properties similar to mild steel and. After annealing the item was plunged into oil for rust protection and giving the item a matt black finish. It is easy to machine and is shock resistant. Jaguar probably moved to Cast Iron on cost grounds saving money on the annealing process but used a plating process for rust protection. The Mk2 saloons changed to Cast Iron in June 1961.

The early cylinders also had a separate piston and backing plate so the parts are not interchangeable with the later cylinders.
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Front Malleable Iron cylinder 8513 (VBO.5370) showing the markings including piston size:
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Front Cast Iron cylinder 8777 (VBO.5505) showing the 'C' mark in front of the piston size:
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The early cylinders used a two part piston attached with two screws and the self-adjusting rod held in place by a plate with six holes and crimped to the cylinder.
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The later cylinders used a one piece piston and the self adjusting rod was retained in a simpler way:
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The rear 1 3/4" cylinders 8514 (VBO.5375) were also Malleable Iron with multi part piston:
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The later rear Cast Iron cylinders 8778 (VBO.5506) had the 'C' mark:
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The Malleable Iron cylinders are quite rare as they were only fitted to 1,380 cars, a service item with limited spares availability and so scrapped on failure. For a concours or original car the front ones are essential as the markings can be easily seen through the wheel spokes. Not so much a problem with the rear as they are impossible to see unless the car is on a ramp. Also be aware Dunlop cylinders were fitted to many cars (Aston Martin, Ferrari, MG, Jaguar saloons etc) but the piston sizes vary depending on the application. For the E-Type you need 2 1/8" front and 1 3/4" rear cylinders but many are offered in the wrong size but claiming to be for the E-Type

Trivia:
1. The Jaguar Mk2 saloons used Malleable Iron #8513 cylinders until June 1961 after which they were Cast Iron. From February 1962 "in the interests of standardisation" the front cylimders #8777 were identical to those fitted to the E-Type.

2. The E-Type brake pad material was changed from Mintex 40 to Mintex 33 with the introduction of the Cast Iron cylinders.

3. The brakes for the XK150S were not carried forward to the E-Type.

Note: If anyone has photos of the early rear brake cylinders without the C marking I would be very grateful to receive them
David Jones
S1 OTS OSB; S1 FHC ODB

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Heuer
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#295 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by Heuer » Mon Jan 10, 2022 9:43 pm

I have updated the post on headlamps following more information and research. This mainly applies to USA delivery cars. viewtopic.php?p=35109#p35109
David Jones
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Heuer
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#296 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by Heuer » Fri Jan 21, 2022 5:41 pm

Seat Belts

From April 1962 Jaguar began supplying seat belts manufactured by BRITAX as optional extras. The stimulus was upcoming US legislation which would mandate fiting points for all cars produced after 1963. Jaguar was also concerned at the burgeoing market for seat belt kits being offered for dealer or owner fitment.

Britax
Britax (London) Ltd., a supplier of accessories for motorcycles and cars, of Maida Vale, London NW6
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1949-56 Maker of motorcycles
1956 Britax returned to the accessory business but took over the Cyclemaster line for a while.
1960 the company's address was Byfleet - presumably part of Proctor Industries by this time
1961 Mr O. A. Proctor acquired Excelsior Motor Co and transferred Proctor Industries, including Britax, into it.
1963 As part of a reorganisation the Britax safety belt business was injected into the Excelsior Motor Co; this led to a substantial turn-around in its commercial fortunes; the company's mechanism for safety belts had been accepted in Germany and Sweden
1968 Name of Excelsior Motor Co was changed to Britax Excelsior Ltd
1969 Introduced Anco wiper blades
1971 The Proctor family sold its Britax-Excelsior safety equipment firm to Griffiths Bentley
1973 Bristol Street Group acquired Griffiths Bentley, including Britax
1979-1985 The Britax name made a come-back on an Italian 50cc fold-up moped known as the Kari-Bike.
1988 The Britax car seat belt business was sold to Electrolux, prompted by technical problems and the need for large investment facing the industry; would continue to make child safety seats

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USA delivery three point Britax belts1966 FHC:
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Seat belts, manufactured by Britax and supplied by Jaguar, were attached to eye bolt anchorage points and each one had a spiral bound wire with a lead seal from the Factory. The seal is stamped “Jaguar” on one side and “FW/M 229A” on the other. FW/M 229A is a Jaguar part number which refers to the eye bolt (although I cannot find a reference to it in the SPC). These, along with the required fittings and the belts, were supplied as a complete kit for Dealer installation.

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The seat belts had hooked plates at the end which clipped onto the eye bolts:
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According to the fitting instructions cross head plastic screws needed to be removed from the gearbox cover and the eye bolts then screwed into place:

As witnessed by the Jaguar SB’s the belts were Factory supplied with the leaper on the buckle by Britax. With each seat belt kit a ‘How to use your Jaguar Seat Belts’ card was tied with string to the seat belts. In addition a four page ‘It’s a question of safety’ leaflet in four languages was included printed with “Made Exclusively for Jaguar Cars Ltd, England by BRITAX”. The leaflet nicely shows the leaper belt buckle.
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Kangol

By the late 1960’s Jaguar started supplying the Kangol safety belt with its magnetic catch as the buckle was lighter and easier to use. The buckles had a plastic sticker with the Jaguar logo and 'Lift'.
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Kangol of Anglobasque Mills, Cleator, Cumberland.

1893 Jakob Henryk Spreiregen born of Jewish parents, in Warsaw, during Russian rule.
Sometime between 1900 and 1910, Jakob escaped the repressive regime in Poland, went to France and adopted the name Jacques Henry Sergene.
1918 Jakob moved to England after the war and started to import Basque berets from France, as there were no manufacturers in England.
1930, Jacque's beret business was booming, so he decided to brand them. Allegedly, he takes the K from either Knitted, the ANG from ANGora and the OL from woOL.
1940 Jacques diversified to produce military caps and denim suits, but the early years of the war were not very successful for him.
1942 With General Montgomery always wearing a beret, it soon rose in popularity to become the must have item of late WW2.
1945 Jacques created a no frills utility beret. This was an instant success.
1950 The Knitting needles logo was registered. Berets were now popular worldwide, so the Frizington factory was opened in order to produce 125,000dozen berets per quarter.
1952 With the prospect of war in Korea, and the rising popularity of berets worldwide, Jacques floated the company on the stock exchange, increased the Frizington factory by 17,500 sq ft, acquired the 161 year old hat company William Carrick and Sons, and the woollen yarn spinners, Thompson Brothers of Huddersfield.
1953 In an effort to free themselves from the whims of fashion, Jacque's nephew, Sylvain Meisener, championed Kangol Helmets Ltd, and produced what was heralded as the 'finest safety helmet' so far. These were quickly followed by industrial safety helmets used for mining and heavy industrial work. At the same time he began to develop a car seat belt with a new magnetic catch system. The Kangol safety division was the start of a diversion for the hat company over the next few years.
1954 Kangol women's hats were also introduced for the first time.
1957 The arrival of George Dan at Kangol brought the revolutionary production process of thermo-forming hats enabling the company to outstrip the rest of the world at hatmaking. This resulted in Kangol selling large quantities of hats to the US and South Africa.
1960 In an attempt to woo investors, Kangol decide to expand into electrical engineering. Jacques bought W. T. Clark and Co of Southampton, who had made parts for the magnetic seatbelt, and Gillone Electric of Camberley. Kangol's new electrical division, Kangalone, was responsible for such products, as a hairdryer that doubled as a room convector heater and the automatic electric time switch, the Timac.
1964 Kangol secured the sole rights to make and distribute any headgear which featured the image endorsement or name of the Beatles.
1966 Mary Quant and Pierre Cardin designed berets for the Kangol brand. Kangol was awarded their first Queens Award for Export.
1968 Other electrical giants of industry outdid Kangalone which sustained losses of over £390,000.
1969 In a bid to concentrate on what they were good at, the Kangalone division was broken up and sold off. The safety division, however, was booming and Kangol supplied 4 out of the 5 main British car manufacturers, as well as exporting to Mercedes and FIAT. The safety division was producing 65% of the Kangol groups sales.



Hickok
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1909 Hickok Manufacturing Corp., launched by S. Rae Hickok, as a small downtown jewellery shop. The business evolved into making monogrammed metal belt buckles, belts and other accessories for men in plants in Rochester and throughout Western New York.
1948 S. Rae Hickock died, his son Raymond took over as Chairman of Hickok Manufacturing at the age of 28.
1949 the company had $20 million in sales and 2,500 employees. A keen business sense and a flair for publicity helped Hickok’s success. He expanded the company’s product base beyond belts and belt buckles to include suspenders, garters and sportswear for men and boys.
1955 Hickok Manufacturing developed an early automotive safety belt
1961 Hickok purchased Philadelphia’s Pioneer Industries Inc., the second-largest manufacturer of men’s accessories.
1963 Hickok agreed to supply seat belts to American Safety Equipment Corp.
1968 Hickok legal issues forced the company out of the seat belt business.
1970 declines in the firm’s menswear lines weakened the company, leaving it in need of a buyer. A locally owned holding company, P.J. Parker Inc., bought Hickok.
1971 Tandy Corp., later known as RadioShack Corp., acquired Hickok.

Hickok Mfg. Co. manufactured car safety belts and in 1963 allowed them to be marketed by American Safety Equipment Corp. but still stamped with the Hickok logo. Many USA E-Type's were fitted with after market Hickok seat belts having the Jaguar ‘wings’ logo pressed into the buckle. It has been assumed these were official Jaguar endorsed items helped by some creative packaging on the part of Hickok!
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Hickok belts were never installed by the factory nor could they be ordered with the car. They were strictly aftermarket, and only installed by US dealers at owner’s request. Legal disputes in the 1960s forced the company out of the seat belt business for good. This is echo’d on Porsche, Mercedes and VW forums as Hickok produced logo'd buckles for several marques.

Trivia: Raymond Hickok was a great-great nephew of the legendary Wild Bill Hickok.
David Jones
S1 OTS OSB; S1 FHC ODB

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rswaffie
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#297 Re: FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Post by rswaffie » Fri Jan 21, 2022 8:17 pm

My Nov 63 fhc, was purchased in Jan 64 and delivered to California where aftermarket belts (Ray Brown) were fitted. They were still in place when I bought it in 2016 and came up very nicely after som polishing. They had a 1964 date on them.

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Richard

S1 3.8 FHC Opalescent Golden Sand with Tan Trim 889504
Now enjoying my diy nut ‘n’ bolt restoration. :swerve: :wrench: :hammer: :fingerscrossed:

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