FACTORY FIT - Series 1 3.8

Talk about the E-Type Series 1
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Heuer
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#21

Post by Heuer » Sun Oct 13, 2013 6:23 pm

Horn Push

The horn push on the E-Type is as iconic as the steering wheel. The motif was made by Fattorini & Sons Ltd of Birmingham who still make badges for Jaguar to this day and is of superb quality. The reproduction horn push is a real compromise though, as you can see from the two side by side:
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You will immediately notice the gold on the original is a much richer colour whilst the repro ones are tending towards silver. The growler is a different size as are the checkers which have their corners cut off. The growlers ears are in the white squares whereas they should be in the black squares. Finally the original has a Bakelite surround which has a slightly matt finish whereas the repro's are glossy plastic. Always try and retain your original on the car (small scratches can be removed with a quality plastic polish, Duraglit/Brasso brings up the Bakelite nicely) or search one out on eBay or a vendor They were used on all the S1 cars so are not that rare but expect to pay ?100+ for a good one. It amazes me how many owners fit the repro version as a matter of course during a restoration without giving a thought to what they are losing. The other parts of the horn button were made by Lucas (model CC5) and the final product assembled by Jaguar:
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Hint: the Growler was used on the hub caps of the S3 cars. The hub caps can be found for about £10 on eBay.
Last edited by Heuer on Mon Dec 07, 2015 1:47 pm, edited 5 times in total.
David Jones
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#22

Post by Heuer » Mon Oct 14, 2013 9:42 pm

Toolkit

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A Hardura tool-roll secured with a leather strap was supplied with every car. The tools were variously marked (or not marked) as 'Garrington', 'Garringtons' 'Snail Brand', 'Eagle', 'SSP', 'TW', 'Bahco' or just 'Sheffield Made in England'.

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John Garrington & Sons
of Albert Works, Darlaston, Staffordshire. Telephone: Darlaston 194/5/6. Telegraphic Address: "Garrington, 'Phone, Darlaston". (1937)
of Newton Works, Bromsgrove and Albert Works, Darlaston, Staffordshire
1837 Company founded.
1877 John Garrington died at the age of 78. His sons, Richand (born 1837) and Benjamin (born 1838), took over the running of the company.
At some point F. W. Cotterill of Darlaston absorbed John Garrington and Sons and the two companies became part of GKN.
1937 Listed Exhibitor - British Industries Fair. Drop Forgings for Aircraft, Automobiles, Motor Cycles, ordinary Cycles, Tube Trades, Agricultural Fittings, General Engineering and Toy Trades. (Stand No. D.518)
1937 Listed Exhibitor - British Industries Fair. Drop forgings for all classes of Aircraft, Shipbuilding, Locomotives, Railway Construction, Automobiles, Machine Tools and General Engineering, etc., in Carbon and Alloy Steels and other metals. Special attention given to heat-treatment. (Stand No. B.606)
1951 Name changed to Garringtons
1961 Manufacturers of drop, upset and precision forgings, and manufacturers of hand tools, induction heating equipment, precision turbine blades and railway buffers and couplings. 3,000 employees.
1968 New fully-automatic forging plant. Part of GKN Forgings

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Accles Ltd
Accles Ltd, general engineers, makers of cycles and cycle components, motor cars, arms and ammunition, of Holford Works, Perry Barr. Although the four box spanners are not marked with a makers name I believe they were produced by Accles & Pollock.

1888 The Gatling Gun Co took over Holdford Mill from the National Arms and Ammunition Co.
1891 Grenfell and Accles Ltd took over the business of the Gatling Gun Co in liquidation.
1896 New company Accles Ltd was set up as a public company to take over the businesses of Grenfell and Accles Ltd and Accles Arms and Ammunition Manufacturing Co and operate them as going concerns; J. G. Accles would join the board. The company would exploit the relatively new process of cold drawing with its considerable potential in the booming bicycle industry. A new weldless steel tube shop would be erected by the vendors; the main activities already at the works were cycles and general engineering and ammunition; a new machine shop would be erected; contracts had been entered into for making the Li-mi-num cycle.
1896-98 Produced a motorised bicycle and tricycles for the British Motor Syndicate
1897 The Fleet Cycle Co was formed and negotiated an agreement with Accles to supply cycle manufacturing equipment to Fleet; eventually it was decided the 2 companies should merge but the agreement had not been signed by the time Accles went into liquidation.
1898 Accles Ltd went into liquidation. The Lu-mi-num Manufacturing Co, in liquidation later that year, had previously placed a large order with Accles for cycle frames; the Accles' receiver had written to shareholders in Lu-mi-num Manufacturing Co that he had taken possession of the business but this did not include Fleet Cycle Co Ltd. The Fleet Cycle Co was later wound up. Accles' secretary, Charles Barlow, took over Accles, forming Accles Tube Syndicate, a venture unconnected with George Accles.
1899 Accles took out patents for a carburettor and for ignition systems for petrol engines.
1899 Accles Tube syndicate formed.
1899 By October, the British pioneer motorist Charles McRobie Turrell, who had helped organise the 1896 London-Brighton "Emancipation" run, joined Accles. A joint 'autocar' patent was taken out, shortly followed by the forming of 'Accles-Turrell Autocars'.
1899 Reference to the Accles machine gun as one of several that had been tested by the US Government.
1900 The Accles works were advertised for sale by order of the High Court.
1900 A new company Accles Turrell Autocars was registered to implement an agreement to acquire the business of motor car and motor cycle manufacturers carried on at Holford Works under the style of Accles-Turrell; the first directors appointed were J. G. Accles, Charles McRobie Turrell, Thomas Pollock and Joseph P. Bedson.
1901 The name was changed to Accles and Pollock, after financial backing was provided by Tom Pollock.
1902 February. The Company was forced to leave Holford Mill, moving to Oldbury.
1910 G. Kynoch and Co acquired Holford Mills

Accles & Pollock

1898 After Accles went into liquidation, Accles secretary, Charles Barlow, took over, forming Accles Tube Syndicate a venture unconnected with George Accles.
1900 A new company Accles Turrell Autocars was registered to implement an agreement to acquire the business of motor car and motor cycle manufacturers carried on at Holford Works under the style of Accles-Turrell; the first directors appointed were J. G. Accles, Charles McRobie Turrell, Thomas Pollock and Joseph P. Bedson.
1900 The Accles works were advertised for sale by order of the High Court
1901 Pollock Engineering Co acquired the rights to make the Accles-Turrell car.
1901 The name of the company (presumably Accles Tube Syndicate) was changed to Accles and Pollock, after financial backing was provided by Mr. Tom Pollock.
1902 The Company was forced to leave Holford Mill, moving to Oldbury in February 1902.
1905 Produced the first tubular box spanners.
1907 Produced the first tubular sections for aircraft and the first tubular furniture.
1909 Two acres of land were acquired in Rounds Green, Oldbury which became Paddock Works.
1910 Incorporated as a limited company for the purpose of amalgamating Accles and Pollock, Oldbury Tube Works Co., Oldbury Steel Conduits Ltd. and Merriman Ltd. The latter 2 companies were then put into liquidation; C. T. Barlow was chairman of Merriman Ltd and Thomas Pollock was chairman of Oldbury Steel Conduits Ltd
1910 Accles and Pollock built the world's first all-metal aircraft, the Mayfly, in their Oldbury factory, using a steel tubing structure.
1914 Manufacturers of steel tubes and electrical conduits and fittings. Specialities: steel tubular parts for cycles, motors, aeroplanes etc. and steel for press work, tubular box spanners, Oldbury system of electrical conduits and fittings. Employees 700.
1919 Advert for tubular box spanners and steel tubing.
1919 The company was purchased by Tube Investments (TI).
1927 Advert for cold-drawn weldless steel tube and tubular components.
1937 Makers and manipulators of weldless and stainless steel tubes, and cold rolled metal sections. "A. and P." and "Ankh" Weldless Steel Tubes. "Apollo" Tubular Box Spanners and Wireless Masts.
1939 Exhibit displayed at New York World?s Fair, an astonishing demonstration of Accles and Pollock?s range of tubing and their ability to manipulate tubes with internal fins, not to mention the maker?s ability to fit everything together perfectly in the case! Now on display at the Black Country Living Museum
1947 British Industries Fair Advert: 'Sporting tubes take their stand'. "True-Temper" and "Apollo" Tubular Steel Golf Shafts, "Apollo" Tubular Steel Fishing Rods and accessories, Archery Bows and Arrows, "Roberts-Apollo" Javelins and Ski-sticks. (Sports Goods Section - Olympia, 1st Floor, Stand No. F.1829)
1963 The company's stainless steel interests were incorporated in T.I. Stainless Steels together with Talbot Stead Steels and Chesterfield Tube
1968 Supplied zirconium pressure tubes for the Winfrith power station.
1996 TI sold the company to the Hay Hall Group.
1998 Sold to the Senior Engineering Group.
1999 Acquired by Tyco International.

From Gatling Guns to Box Spanners - quite a heritage!
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Some spanners in the tool kit are marked 'SSP' which stands for 'Sheffield Steel Products':

Sheffield Steel Products
of Templeborough Works, Sheffield. Telephone: Sheffield 41241. Cables: "Solidity, Sheffield

1918 Private company.
1919 Company made public.
1919 Acquired the National Projectile Factory at Templeborough, Sheffield
1920 At time of public sale of shares, claimed to be "largest manufacturer of table cutlery in the world"; consisted of a number of companies which had been amalgamated into this company:
W. K. and C. Peace, Carr, Wild and Co, Boswell, Hatfield and Co. Moses Eadon and Sons (wholly owned). E. W. Cheesman and Co, Joseph Peace and Co, Arnold and Son, Chaucer Plating Co, Sheffield Scissors, Razor and Tool Co, Oxley Brothers (wholly owned), Hemmings and Co, Amalgamated Stampers which incorporated stampers and drop forgers Armstrong, Stevens and Son, Smethwick Stamping Co and Steel Stampings Ltd, Acme Screw Co and Herbert Plumpton. By linking these businesses, the company hoped to achieve economies of manufacture from vertical integration and investment in new machines., including steel plant and rolling mills.
1922 Recognising that retailers were making a substantial margin on the company's products, another company was established, Sheffield Steel Products (Stores) Ltd, to establish and operate retail establishments in various parts of the country
1923 Capital reconstruction instituted as the only alternative to winding-up
1925 Major reorganisation had been implemented; clear break established with the Stores business; the company would concentrate on the wholesale trade
1927 The Stores business was put into voluntary liquidation
1929 Listed Exhibitor - British Industries Fair. Manufacturers of Cutlery and Tools, Stainless Steel Table Cutlery, all Metal Cutlery, Electroplate, Spoons and Forks, Canteens and Cabinets, Pocket Knives, Garden Shears, Saws, Edge Tools, etc. Magneto Magnets, Telephones, Meters. (Stand No. J.35)
1936 Sold Smethwick Stamping Co
1936 Created new public company Armstrong, Stevens and Son Ltd which it sold to Messrs Victor Riley and John Harper Bean who then sold shares to the public.
1939 Sale of surplus land at Templeborough; capital reduction. Acquired Burt Brothers Ltd of Birmingham, coppersmiths and metal spinners
WWII Made 12 million solid-handled knives, 2 million clasp knives, as well as files, permanent magnets, wire cutters, saws, edge tools, etc
1959 Purchased by Arusha Industries Ltd.
1961 Manufacturers of magnets, files, tools, cutlery, stampings and pressings. Brass and coppersmiths and metal spinners.
1965 Sold British Rustless Iron and Steel Products to Hiram Wild

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Some spanner sets were marked 'Snail Brand'

Snail Brand
They were made by Thomas Smith & Sons of Saltley Ltd., Birmingham. Thomas Smith is said to have chosen the snail as his brand because his motto was, "The snail may be slow, but he gets there in the end"
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1848: manufacturer of velocipedes and small hand tools.
1896: operating out of Saltley Mill in Birmingham.
1937: in addition to custom drop forgings, they advertised spanners, adjustable wrenches, hammers, and hatchets of all descriptions. 1960's: factory was moved from Saltley to Coleshill. Many of their products (hammers, hatchets, garden tools, spanners (chrome-vanadium & carbon steel) plus their adjustable & pipe wrenches) were exported to India.
1973: became part of Smith Francis Tools Ltd of Priory Works, 68 to 70 Cheapside, Birmingham. Founded 1934.
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Some spanner sets were embossed with the TW logo.

TW (T. Williams)
Maker of spanners and pliers, of Tilton Road Works, Small Heath, Birmingham 9
1958: Acquired by Eva Brothers
1960: Drop forgings and tools.
1962: Subsidiary of Eva Industries
1973: Acquired by Smith Francis Tools Ltd of Priory Works, 68 to 70 Cheapside, Birmingham. Founded 1934 and still in business today.
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The toolkit was a roll, not the saloon style round case which may have been fitted to the very first cars for publicity purposes as this picture of 9600 HP shows:
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Illustration of 4.2 toolkit (different jack, screwdriver and federal spinner wrench but otherwise the same as the 3.8 ):
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For identification purposes:
Single bladed screw driver marked JAGUAR (twin bladed from Jan 1963)
4″ adjustable spanner marked JAGUAR and GARRINGTONS
2 dome top Tommy bars, 6" and 10"
Type pressure gauge marked DUNLOP No. 6 J (note the 'J'; there is a Dunlop No 6 without the J)
Brass tyre valve extractor marked DUNLOP
4 Box spanners - 3 nesting 6″ long (smallest was 5" long up to December 1961):
7/16 x 1/2 & 9/16 x 5/8 & 3/4 x 7/8 - all marked A/F
1/2 BSF x 3/4 A/F
4 open ended spanners marked JAGUAR and SSP:
3/4 x 7/8 AF
9/16/ x 7/8 AF
7/16 x 1/2 AF
11/32 x 3/8 AF
Valve timing gauge
Pliers marked SHEFFIELD and SSP
Feeler gauge marked 6, 4 & 8
Lucas points setting tool
Grease gun marked Teclamit GC 3020 with paper wrapper and blue or red print
Handbrake adjuster (notionally only supplied for the very early cars)
Dunlop brake bleeder pipe in tin

Note: Box spanners were gun blued up to Dec 61, after that a black oxide finish.

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Early tin without logo
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Later tin with Dunlop logo introduced in November 1961:
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Some toolkits contained this angled screwdriver #C10154 for securing the battery terminals. It is listed in the XK and Saloon SPC but not in the E-Type SPC. It is an essential item however:
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The 1961/62 cars had a single fixed flat head blade screwdriver. From cars #850648/878937/861071/888138 a three part screwdriver was introduced consisting of handle, flat blade and cross head blade presumably to coincide with the introduction of Phillips/Pozidrive screws on the car.
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With the introduction of the Duplex pulley's and belt a spare fan belt was supplied and this leaflet was included with the Handbook:
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Jaguar probably included the spare because Duplex belts would have been hard to find if one broke on the road.

Note: Roger Payne has written a very comprehensive set of articles for the Club magazine (June - Nov 2017) detailing all the changes to the 3.8 toolkit. Bud Marston has written a very clear and concise article detailing all the tools and can be found in the JCNA journal.
Last edited by Heuer on Tue Sep 29, 2015 2:05 pm, edited 8 times in total.
David Jones
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#23

Post by Heuer » Sun Oct 20, 2013 1:01 pm

Low pressure hose clips

Part C15886/5 the clip marked 5/8" used to secure the vacuum hoses; 4 required. Note they are not Jubilee or Cheney clips:
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Richard Smith has NOS clips for £2 each.
The same part is listed in the Spare Parts Catalogue as securing the hose to the clutch/brake fluid bottles and the smaller C15886/4 for securing the hose to the hydraulic pipes. However the current types of available hose are less than 5/8" so these clips will not fit to ensure a leak free joint. The original Girling 'yellow strip' hose was 5/8" but no longer available.

Breather pipe clips C.15886/8
These 7/8" clips were used on the post 500 cars to secure the breather hose to the manifold plenum. They were also used on the S1 4.2 cars:

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Last edited by Heuer on Wed Jul 02, 2014 4:18 pm, edited 5 times in total.
David Jones
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#24

Post by Heuer » Sun Oct 20, 2013 1:41 pm

Spark Plug Caps

Plug caps and spark plugs were supplied by the Champion Spark Plug Co. of 83 Pall Mall, London, SW1 (1937) and of Feltham (1963):
1899 Albert Champion, a champion bicycle racer, left his native France for Boston, Massachusetts.
1904 Champion established the Champion Spark Plug Company in Boston
1908 Albert Champion split with his Boston investors, who kept the Champion Spark Plug Company name.
1908 With the backing of the Buick Motor Co., Champion began a new company called the Champion Ignition Company. Albert Champion was appointed president.
1909 Following a legal challenge by his former company the name was changed to AC Spark Plug Company, after Champion's initials
1916 Alfred P. Sloan formed General Motors Corp. and eventually acquired Buick and AC Spark Plug
1927 Champion died of a heart attack. General Motors purchased the remaining stock held by Champion's estate and took over the AC company.
1937 Sparking plug manufacturers. "Champion" Sparking Plugs
1954 Plugs supplier to Rolls-Royce.
1963 Motor Show exhibitor. Spark plugs
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The very early 3.8's had WC548 spark plug caps with the circular 'Champion' lettering on the top and a dot in the centre (known as Champion 'Dot' caps) e.g Car #875103 dispatched June 1961:
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All UK cars had suppressed plug caps by law to prevent RF radiation interfering with emergency services radio:
WCX548 'dot' caps:
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The 1959 Mini used the 'Dot' caps and and some Mini owners are totally committed when it comes to originality so the above set of four caps, in so-so condition, sold for £800 on eBay :shock: They are occasionally available as reproductions from the 1959 Mini Register http://1959miniregister.com/ at £90 for four - talk to them nicely and they may sell you six!
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Norman Motors Ltd appear to be selling a set of six for ?68: http://tinyurl.com/qzcpr4y
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From about October 1961 onwards the Champion WC548 'Oval' plug cap was fitted. This is the January 1963 blue FHC from the start of this thread (albeit with the later August 1964 conduit fitted):
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Reproductions of the WC548 are available from 'The Green Spark Plug Comany' http://www.gsparkplug.com/shop/ although they do not have the word 'Champion' embossed. The ones from Steadyfast Cycles do however: https://steadfastcycles.com/collections ... g-and-wire and they provide a prompt service. Champion also produced the WCX548 which included a 5k suppression resistor for use with a radio. The WCX548 (pictured on the right) is not currently reproduced.
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From mid 1964 Champion issued the WCX600 plug caps with their 'bow-tie' logo, still produced by Champion and readily available today. The 'X' signifies it includes a 5k suppression resistor. SPC J30 June 1963 says "#C16979 Terminal For Sparking Plug Leads (Incorporating Suppressor)".
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1951 advert showing 'Bow-tie' logo
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1964 advert showing 'Bow-tie' logo:
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In Summary (dates approximate):
Up until September 1961 - Champion WC548 'Dot' caps
Up until June 1964 - Champion WC548 'Oval' caps
June 1964 onwards - Champion WCX600 'Bow-tie' caps (suppressed)
Export cars #C17456 (no suppressor) was specified so a WC548 dot or oval.
UK cars #C16979 was specified so WCX548 dot or oval with plug in suppressors. All cars were eventually fitted with the WCX suppressed plug caps (bow tie design by then) as witnessed by the Nov 1965 J37 parts catalogue.

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Spark Plugs

The 3.8 cars were fitted with Champion N-12Y spark plugs.
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If you intend to use the no suppression resistor WC548 plug caps you should use the RN-12Y plugs which have a resistor built in to avoid radio interference.
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Last edited by Heuer on Fri May 20, 2016 9:50 am, edited 35 times in total.
David Jones
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#25

Post by Heuer » Mon Oct 21, 2013 11:27 am

Keys

Wilmot Breeden (UNION) keys were used by Jaguar and many other British car companies. One side of the key says WILMOT BREEDEN, the other showing MADE IN ENGLAND and UNION The key code number was stamped on the face of the ignition switch - typically FP 626 through to FP 750 and FS 876 through to FS 955. FP come in Round and Square head shape only. A single key was supplied for both ignition and doors. The 3.8's had the round head FP key but towards the end of 3.8 production and for the 4.2's the square head FS was supplied.

The door locks, glove box lock, trunk lock will have numbers stamped on the body of the lock (No letters). The correct blanks are very hard to find but you could try Pete Groh: petegroh@aol.com cost is about $25 each if he has the blanks.
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Key Fobs

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The optional key fobs were the Jaguar 'wings' part #5194 available in any colour leather to match the upholstery:
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From May 1962, the black leather with enamelled Jaguar 'Growler' part #9036. Some fobs had a heavy grain others were smooth:
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Originals are hugely expensive (they were made by Castle Union Developments of Leicester and stamped CUD Ltd) but JCNA sell a repro #5194 for about $15 + p&p; the #9036 fobs are being reproduced by Classic Leather Fobs for £40
Last edited by Heuer on Fri May 27, 2016 5:24 pm, edited 13 times in total.
David Jones
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#26

Post by Heuer » Mon Oct 21, 2013 11:45 am

Petrol Cap

The early cars had a 3" diameter chrome fuel filler cap with a knurled edge later replaced with the cast grooved version which was easier to use. The caps were a generic item fitted to many cars during the 50's and 60's:
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Originals fetch between £30 and £50, reasonable reproductions are available for £17. Here is a tip for you though - search eBay for 'chrome filler cap' without adding 'E-Type' and you will find quite a few at very reasonable prices. I bought the one pictured recently for 99p and I had three to chose from! Make sure it has the vent holes though.

Locking Petrol Cap

A locking petrol cap was offered as an option, part # C12816, and was another generic item from the British motor industry parts bin - Wilmot Breedon in fact - WB.7/8653.

Wilmot Breedon
Motor accessory engineers, of Camden Street, Birmingham
1920s C. L. Breeden joined a small company employing 200 people.
1927 Breeden converted the company into the Wilmot Breeden company
1936 Supplied chromium plated bumpers to Standard.
1937 Aeronautical engineers.
1948 Private company. Supplier of many accessories for motor vehicles
1949 Advert. Locking petrol cap
1949 Public company Wilmot Breeden (Holdings) Ltd was formed to acquire the business and assets of Accessory Developments Ltd. Philip Breeden, a director, was also a director of Wayne-Kerr Laboratories Ltd. Published statement that the company had been formed to acquire business of the same name which manufactures various metal goods, including for the motor industry
1952 5000 employees.
1954 Supplied components to almost all British car manufacturers. Increasing component supply to aircraft industry.
1955 Acquired the remainder of the shares in Telehoist, having first acquired an interest some years previously.
1958 Wilmot Breeden acquired a majority interest in Wayne-Kerr Company, specialist in electronic measuring equipment.
1958 Wilmot Breeden acquired (majority of) the Ferrograph Company Ltd; the other subsidiary was Telehoist Ltd, hydraulics company and added higher powered amplifiers, radio tuners and monitor loudspeakers to Ferrograph's range of products.
1961 Products of the group are mainly comprising components parts and assemblies for the following industrial divisions: motor vehicles; domestic appliances; aircraft engines and stationary gas turbines; hydraulics; electronics; air-conditioning and pneumatic conveying installations; petroleum, chemical, nuclear and industrial process plant. 9,000 group employees.
1963 Motor Show exhibitor. All types of car components
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You can find them fairly easily on eBay by not including 'E-Type' in your search!
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Look for the 'pinched' key cover, knurled edge, 3" diameter and two lugs + 1 locking on the underside. The inner hub must be 1 1/2" in diameter
Last edited by Heuer on Fri Oct 23, 2015 2:49 pm, edited 6 times in total.
David Jones
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#27

Post by Heuer » Sun Oct 27, 2013 5:04 pm

Sun Visors

There were two styles of sun visor fitted to the FHC's although neither Haddock nor JCNA make mention or recognise the fact. The first style is rectangular with chrome plated plastic edging:
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FHC #860040

The second style is trapezoidal in shape:
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FHC #860294

Both styles were attached to the same type of chrome bracket with a separate push in chrome head at the other end. Either one was fitted throughout production of the S1 and it seems to have been done randomly. The rectangular style is the same as was fitted to the Mk2 saloon's so it was likely they fitted whichever was in stock. The trapezoidal version is far more svelte than the rectangular one and more in keeping with the E-Type's interior in my view. It is also narrower which probably makes it more usable on the small windscreen. The rectangular version was fitted to the 2+2's as they had a bigger windscreen.

The chromed plastic trim is no longer available so restoration of the rectangular version can be difficult. As Haddock/JCNA do not recognise the rectangular version even exists I wonder if they were only fitted to RHD cars?
Last edited by Heuer on Wed Jul 02, 2014 4:20 pm, edited 2 times in total.
David Jones
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#28

Post by Heuer » Sun Oct 27, 2013 5:20 pm

Alloy Dash

There were two types of alloy dash pattern. Early cars had the dots:
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Later cars (from around November 1962 #860912, 850609, 878301 and 887131) had the cross pattern:
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It seems likely the change from dot to cross pattern coincided with the change from the beech Coventry Timber Bending Co. steering wheels to the Mahogany grooved steering wheels. Porter says there was a third pattern consisting of "lozenge shaped dots" but I have never seen one. From about September 1963 the dash was changed from embossed aluminium to leather and vinyl.
Last edited by Heuer on Sat Feb 21, 2015 6:32 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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#29

Post by Heuer » Tue Oct 29, 2013 7:24 pm

The Lucas 2SJ Screenjet

A Lucas 2SJ windscreen washer and glass bottle was fitted to the 3.8 cars. It was replaced from April 1965 on the 4.2 cars with a Lucas 5SJ windscreen washer in a plastic bottle. What is unique about the 2SJ version is it had a one touch, 5 second wash facility requiring three connections. Early versions (up to 1960) worked as follows (from the Lucas instructions):

"Water from the container enters the auxiliary reservoir through a gauze filter and inlet orifices in the base of the pump, and each operation of the pump discharges the contents of the reservoir through the nozzle and on to the windscreen. The pump rotor is designed so that when it is rotated at speed and is freely supplied with water from the auxiliary reservoir, a thrust is developed which causes the rotating parts to move upwards. This movement is employed: -

(A) to close a pair of electrical contacts situated inside the motor housing, and
(B) to close the water inlet orifices

The motor is set in motion by momentarily pressing the push-button operating switch. The subsequent upward movement of the rotating parts then closes the internal electrical contacts, thus maintaining the motor in motion, and cuts off the water supply to the auxiliary reservoir. When the latter is empty, the upward thrust is no longer present, so that the rotating parts move downwards to their original position, and the electrical contacts are separated, so stopping the motor. The water inlet orifices are opened to allow the auxiliary reservoir to refill in readiness for the next operation.
Air, to replace the water discharged, is admitted to the glass container through a groove in the rubber filler cover, and to the auxiliary reservoir through the mounting tabs.
"


Later versions worked by flicking the washer switch which started the motor running by connecting it to earth and also heated a bi-metallic strip enclosed in the motor housing which maintained an earth circuit allowing the motor to run when the switch was released. As the bi-metallic strip cooled the motor was switched off. There is a screw adjustment on the top of the motor housing to set the delay (the presence of this screw differentiates the two versions). In addition the washer impeller was at the end of a shaft enclosed in a plastic shroud which acted as a filter and to create a vortex of fluid assisting pressure. Frankly both versions were hopeless systems as setting the delay was difficult and if it went wrong it caused the motor to burn out. Having the impeller remote from the motor increased drag which also caused the motor to burn out. :roll: They come up frequently on eBay (they were fitted to many British cars of the period) but invariably include the caveat "Not tested but looks good". I don't know when the changeover from mechanical to bi-metallic timers occurred but I have a bi-metallic version and it is date stamped 1960. They are all date stamped on the rear side of the motor housing, usually highlighted in white. This is from a 1962 Lucas-Jaguar catalogue:

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On the early cars the filler stoppers (they are actually 'measures' for doping the washer bottle so were not filled with sponge material as some owners claim) were a vivid metallic blue colour whilst on the later bottles these were changed to black. Other than the colour there is no physical difference except the blue versions seem to be made of a vinyl like material whilst the black versions are a rubber compound. I have not been able to establish when the changeover occurred but mid 1962 would be my guess based on the 1962 Lucas catalogue photo above (#860294 has a Screenjet dated 1960 and has the blue filler).
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Expect to find pumps dated much earlier than your car production as Lucas made a lot of these for various car producers so stock levels were all over the place.

Car 875039 (courtesy of Ian Howe):
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The labels also changed. Up to mid 1963 this label was in use:
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Reproductions of both style labels are available on eBay.

Notes:

1. The 2SJ can easily be distinguished from the 5SJ or repro's by the fact they have three contacts, the 5SJ has only two. The 5SJ also does not have the remote impeller as it uses a more conventional pump and works a lot better.
2. Lucas Screenjet sticker: I cannot find this sticker on any period photos or any of the cars as the start of this thread. The J30 SPC shows the bottle mount without any sticker yet in contradiction to its advice on the coil the JCNA Judge's Guide says it should be there. Personally I don't think the sticker should be there as Jaguar were at great pains to ensure there were no overt decals advertising other companies products on the E-Type.
3. The washer bottle bracket is held in place by three slotted 1" long screws #UFS419/8H with distance pieces #BD18957/1 keeping the bracket away from the bulkhead.
4. 2SJ Screenjet service instructions can be found here: Lucas 2SJ service guide: https://www.dropbox.com/s/w98c0ckmhl3iw ... s.pdf?dl=1
Last edited by Heuer on Mon Oct 05, 2015 3:07 pm, edited 17 times in total.
David Jones
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#30

Post by Dave K » Tue Oct 29, 2013 11:15 pm

David,

with regard to the ignition key you can pick them up at various classic car shows very cheap.
When I went to the Wroughton classic car show a few years ago with Angus I picked one up there for around ?2. There was also a guy at Stoneleigh last week at the Mini show who had a bunch of keys if I had thought and brought my old E-Type key I would have looked for another spare.

Dave

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#31

Post by Heuer » Thu Oct 31, 2013 11:16 am

Car Jack

Shelley

The first 5,000 or so cars (~ June 1962) were fitted with a Shelley LJ225 droop snout three stage jack.
Right Hand Drive OTS: to #850548.
Left Hand Drive OTS: to #877518.
Right hand Drive FHC: to #860660.
Left Hand Drive FHC: to #886246.

It was the only jack in the LJ225 range to be three stage so is unique to the E-Type. Earliest cars had a plain droop snout jack whilst later on there was a reinforcing gusset on the snout following reports of breakage. The jacks are dated.

R. T. Shelley
Makers of automotive accessories
1908 - Private company.
1908 - The Norton company was bought by Bob Shelley, who owned R. T. Shelley, an automotive accessories manufacturing business. Most people credit James Norton with the success of the company but actually, without Bob Shelley, there probably would not have been a Norton motorcycle company at all. R. T. Shelley were already suppliers to Norton so the transfer of power was made a little easier - however the relationship between Bob Shelley and James Norton was not a good one.
1913 - James Norton was not a business man, his strengths lay elsewhere. His company ran into trouble and was forced into liquidation in 1913.
1916 - the Shelley company moved to Phillips Street, Aston. Bill Mansell moved from R. T. Shelley to take over Norton management and under his guidance the company was reformed in 1926, the new company name being Norton Motors (1926) Ltd.
1953 - AMC acquired Norton including its wholly-owned subsidiary R. T. Shelley.
1961 - General engineers, manufacturing tools and components for automobiles and aero engines, also manufacturers of lifting jacks for private and commercial vehicles. 400 employees.
1969 - Tangye, another jack maker bought out Shelley and the company renamed Tangye-Shelley Limited, Gough Road, Greet, Birmingham B11 2NG
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Droop snout without reinforcing gusset:

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Shelley with 95% original finish and note the 'black' operating rod - probably hot dipped in oil as with other tools:
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This is the clip used to retain the lever (exact copies available from Richard Smith) and where they are located:
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Over the 14 months of Shelley jack use by Jaguar, the very first examples were date coded LJ225 59, followed by undated LJ225, then finally date coded LJ225 61. Only the very earliest E-types, up to about May 1961 build, had the LJ225 59 dated bases. Shelley supplied the jacks to Jaguar in protective single ply hessian bags (stitched into a triangular shape to match the jack) to protect them from paint chips during transport as was the jack handle (in a tubular bag). You can use this type to make your own:
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After stitching turn them inside out, push any excess into the base of the jack.

Shelley jack in its correct 'factory fit' position with its protective hessian bag (sometimes thick paper bag) and anti-rattle wedge (a piece of rubberised felt, black on one side 18"x18"). The jack and handle in their hessian bags as can be seen in the bottom picture:
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Period photo. Notice the can of touch-up paint and the hessian bag covering the jack and handle.
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Correct colour seems to be BS632 Dark Admiralty Grey or RAL7030 Stone Grey or Rustoleum Painters Touch 'Winter Grey' Gloss which has been available since 1921 and was popular on wheelbarrows.
Jack handle is a straight 3/8" x 18" long bar retained by clips in wheel well (original style clips are available from Richard Smith); it is invariably a loose fit in the jack as the hole wears with use. If you want it perfect you can use filler but you can never use it again. You should consider the Shelley as for 'decorative' purposes because its design makes it unstable on anything other than a perfectly flat surface and that bullet shaped head can easily punch a hole in the cill. Always carry a modern jack or a Metallifacture version.

Metallifacture

1930 - Metallifacture established factory in Baldwin Street, Nottingham with head office in Huntingdon Street, Nottingham
1967 - moved to Redhill, Nottingham
1999 - acquired by Dura Automotive Ltd
2003 - acquired by Magal Engineering Ltd
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Metallifacture was located in Nottingham, England as a manufacturer of jacks and tyre carriers for the European automotive industry. Patent for a "a jack comprises load-carrying member 11 which is raised relatively to a ground-engaging member 1 by rotating a screw 5, by a nut 7." was filed in October 1958. It's customers included Ford, General Motors, Rover, Nissan and Volkswagen."
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From June 1962 #850549/877519/860661/886247 the Metallifacture with integrated handle was supplied by Jaguar:
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Early Metallifacture jacks were stamped:
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The patent was approved on 9th August 1962 and the jacks were then stamped:
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A few hundred cars produced during June and September 1962 may have had the 'Patent Applied For' stamped jacks. However the early jacks had a manufacturing defect so you need too be careful if you intend using one:
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Last edited by Heuer on Fri May 06, 2016 1:56 pm, edited 57 times in total.
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#32

Post by Heuer » Wed Nov 06, 2013 6:26 pm

Headlamps
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The 3.8 RHD cars were fitted with the iconic Lucas PL700 headlamps (not to be confused with the earlier P700 headlamps with the round logo shield):

Original PL700 RHD:
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Most LHD cars were fitted with Lucas pre-focus F700 headlamps however Lucas supplied either type for LHD and RHD:
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Reproduction PL700's are widely available but lens quality is poor. You can tell the difference between an original and a repro unit because:

1. Repro's have '700 Headlamp' moulded into the lower edge of the lens whereas originals do not
2. Originals have 'Made in England' moulded into the glass, repro's do not
3. Originals use a 410 fitment tungsten bulb whereas repros use H4 fitting halogen bulbs.
4. Originals have a shiny metallic back whereas repro's have a dull grey back.

Originals can be restored http://www.vintage-headlamp-restoration.co.uk/ Reproduction F700's are also available. More information on the Lucas '700' series headlamps here: http://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/8496 ... dlamps.pdf

Of course this begs the question of whether a LHD car used in the UK should be fitted with the PL700 head lamps if it is to be Factory 'correct' and what do you do with a LHD car converted to RHD? :?

Ian Howe adds:

Lucas Bulb Adaptor

Several of the books on E Type originality mention that early cars were fitted with Lucas PL700 or other types - and some cars were fitted with non-PL lights. Whilst I guess this type of light could have been fitted after production - I would seem sensible to fit a more modern sealed beam unit - indeed this car had a later GE sealed beam unit on one side. The other light seems original as shown below?

The tripod version of the BPF (British Pre-Focus) light unit was fitted to many cars from 1945 to 1963 - and was fitted to 875039.
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Light Bulb and Lucas adaptor. To use BPF lamps on a non-BPF headlight loom (as fitted to the E Type) an adaptor was fitted - Lucas part number 554691
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Bulb Detail
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Last edited by Heuer on Sat Oct 25, 2014 5:51 pm, edited 9 times in total.
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#33

Post by Heuer » Wed Nov 06, 2013 7:08 pm

Steering Wheel

When Jaguar launched the E-Type they decided upon a very unusual (for the time) approach to marketing. The brochure did not feature a picture of the car, rather it showed a picture of the steering wheel.
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The first steering wheels were made by the Coventry Timber Bending Company Ltd (who made the D-Type steering wheels) as part #C15168 and fitted until early 1963; cost to Jaguar was £1/11/2d. They were constructed from eight 1/8" beech veneers 55" long and 4" wide bonded together in a circular mould (ends staggered/trimmed so no single break), cured by low frequency heating and spliced to make four 1" wide x 16" diameter wheels. Each wheel was split, recessed to take the drilled aluminium spider, bonded, grooved, hand finished and polished on a lathe. The wood was clear lacquered and the lamination process produced a very strong flex free rim, stiffer than the aluminium spokes. Each one is a different colour (no dye was used) but they all tend to be a gorgeous light blond colour. As far as the colour of the CTB Ltd wheel it is to be expected there will be a colour variation as they were made from beech veneers so subject to natural variation. However if you look at period pictures of the D-Type's and the early E-Type's you will see the wheels are all very light in colour and it seems they were made from selected veneers to give that iconic look - it was what CTB Ltd were known for, a high quality bespoke product. As Jaguar demanded more wheels the cost, time and supply constraints would have prevented the CTB craftsmen from selecting the veneers they would like to use. The company could not cope and which is why Jaguar later decided to change production technique to be guaranteed supply, quality and lower cost. My observations suggest the iconic 'blonde' beech wheel was only seen on the very early cars; maybe the first 500. After that CTB began using a mix of beech and mahogany which gave the wheels a very pleasing light and dark banding. Eventually CBT could not cope with demand and production was transferred elsewhere and the cheaper mahogany wheel was used.

Originals are rare and very expensive. Reproductions are hard to find because of the manufacturing difficulties but you could try Steering Wheel Restorations Ltd.

Geoff Green added: "In the early 1960s changes to cars were not planned as model year changes as in the late 1960s when marketing and advertising gained sway that continues today. I have been researching changes to produce the most accurate restoration I can on my 1961 OTS. I feel since I am replacing so many parts I might as well install period correct ones and mainly NOS as I find them. This task has me looking at hundreds of photos of cars knowing there will be a point when the change becomes apparent. With my knowledge of service and parts replacement over the years I worked at the Jaguar dealership with new customer quality standards higher than the factory, dealer employee errors causing damage, shipping damage, warranty repair experiments, etc. eating up replacement parts that will not go on new cars. There are people who, as the cars age, will throw on whatever is laying around to get the car going and then there are professional restorers who will err in research, or not do any research, and place the incorrect part on a car. Thanks to David Jones for providing the order specifics of the early 1960s using multiples of 500 and allowing 8% for rejects, service spares, chipped or broken on the production line we should be looking for a change at 2,300, 4,600 or 6,900 cars. This can be checked by applying known serial number breaks and turns out to be quite accurate. Going through the photos I know the #C15168 (CTB Ltd) will end abruptly and the #C20267 (mahogany with thumb groove) will continue without change. Although there is a remote possibility someone placed and early wheel on a late car I do not expect to run into this. However there is a very good possibility the later wheels #C20267 will be placed on early cars because they are available, easy and inexpensive to use to fix the "bad" wheel on an early car where the parts for repair of #C15168 may not be available. So I expect many #C20267 wheels on early cars, still there will be a break indicating the point of change. Sure enough the change occurs about 878300 (I only checked LHD OTS) 19 cars before the 63 I have to inspect. This puts the change at the point the aluminium pattern was changed from dot to cross hatch at 850610, 860913, 878302 and 887132 for a total of 6,957 cars with #C15168 and from those numbers steering wheel #C20267 was used. Haddock supports these numbers. David's order number is at 6,900 cars. It makes sense that interior trim would be changed together to offer a 'new' car to the public with shipping and sales to approach a new year - '1963'. "

Mike Lempert added:

"Hello all. I just today received another early E-Type wheel for restoration and it reminded me of this earlier attempt to provide the E folks with information.

David: Thanks for your message. I didn't see it before now - maybe I don't have notification turned on. In any case, thanks for that historical information.

Beech was a widely used wood for rims in England. The beech that was used was European beech which is slightly different from the beech here in the states. I figured it was chosen for its excellent bending characteristics. During the early '50s Coventry Timber Bending (CTB) used beech for their D-Type rims and for the rims they made for the Austin-Healey 100S cars. Additionally, they made beech rims in the early '60s for some special MGA wheels. There was at least one other company, Woodrims Limited (of Slough), who made beech rings for Peter Springall to use for his rims - mostly Lotus, but some aftermarket too.

When the early S1 E-Type wheels were made by CTB, they chose to use beech, but not exclusively as many of you believe. I am aware "it was written" in a book and many consider that the definitive word, but I am also aware of many other examples of incorrect or incomplete entries in books about various car marques. I'll comment further, but first a few more words about the use of mahogany.

Victor Derrington used mahogany for his steering wheel rims starting in or around 1954, the date of his initial patent filing. His rims were made of (sapele) mahogany and obeechi (obeeche,obeche). He also advertised using white sycamore (really a maple) in place of the obeechi. Most, if not all I have seen have been mahogany and obeechi. Obeechi must have been a very cheap alternative to something better, like beech or maple. While I'm not aware of the years Walsall Wheels operated, they used mahogany exclusively from what I have seen. Walsall was the maker of the Les Leston line of steering wheels and they also made wheels to sell as just Walsall.

Now back to CTB and the jaguar E-Type wheels. While CTB did use beech for the early E-Type rims, most of what I have seen here from wheels sent to me for restoration have been mahogany. I have no idea how many of each of the two woods were made, only what I have personally seen. I have had at least a dozen, probably more, here over the past 15 years that I have been doing this work. Rest assured I do know woods and I do know how to distinguish the differences. Beech and mahogany are quite different from each other. It is not only the color, but the character of the grain, and in particular, the ray flake on the quartersawn angle is distinctive. I have further information based on several mahogany rims. While some were simple mahogany wrappings (process for creating rings), others were more fancy. I speculate that the people (or person) making the rings at CTB had creative moments. Some of these mahogany rims featured different color mahogany, resulting in attractive patterns. This technique was not exclusive to CTB - it was also done by Walsall and it is a defining characteristic to Carlotti rims (although the Carlotti most often used a combination of mahogany and beech to create the patterns). I think it is not likely that the rim makers were instructed to do this since the rims weren't all precisely the same. Some used double dark strips and some just single strip dark. The first time I saw it I thought it an anomaly, but now realize it was done quite frequently. The wheel I received today is an example of the mahogany rim with two dark wood strips used to create the stripes. I presume most of you know the basic differences between the early CTB wheels and the common ones that followed. For those that don't, and aside from wood species, the CTB rims were shaped in rounded style rather than the thumb groove on the common wheels. CTB rims were 3/4 wraps, meaning the inside metal rim was exposed. The common wheels had full wraps where wood covered all sides of the internal metal rim. The finger grips were also different with the CTB using a four repeat pattern.

Now if I can figure out how to post some pictures, I will show you this latest wheel to arrive and an area of it where I have cleaned the patina to expose the wood pattern. This rim is missing the outermost stip of wood. In one picture I have wetted it to enhance the color differences. I have written this message and taken the pictures as a service to this community. My intent is only to provide you with accurate information on a subject not well understood. I hope this is of some value.
Gallery here - pictures will be added when restoration complete: http://www.pbase.com/mdlempert/s1jag2
Another example from some years ago: http://www.pbase.com/mdlempert/s1jag
Here a simple mahogany version: http://www.pbase.com/mdlempert/invent3b
Regards,
Mike Lempert
http://www.lempertwheels.com"


How to identify an original Jaguar wheel:

So how can you tell the difference between an original wheel and a reproduction wheel I hear you ask…. Well, even the reproduction wheels of the 1980’s are beginning to look suitably old but don’t let that influence your judgement. The reproduction wheels normally had a makers stamp on the reverse of one of the spokes and this will certainly give it away, however, some have gone to the trouble of grinding the name out and polishing the whole area to hide the evidence. But this is not the only tell tale sign of an incorrectly made repro Jaguar E type steering wheel; To begin with, the upper edge of the right and left spokes on original wheels are not completely horizontal and this was a Jaguar design to counteract the illusion created by the tapering spokes and the need for the upper spokes to appear horizontal giving the symmetrical ‘T’ configuration. It’s only a matter of a few degrees but it is important and not difficult to train the eye to detect it, because if you can perfectly line up a ‘straight-edge’ over the top edge of the two upper spokes, then the wheel does look slightly different and it is a repro wheel. There are however more important points to look out for with the fully wrapped wheels, relating to the quality and detail in the wood shaping and finishing. Reproduction wheels have a relatively deep step where the wood section blends into the front face of the spokes unlike the beautifully blended form that ‘feathers’ into the spokes on the original wheels. You should be able to run your thumb along the spoke’s face and over onto the wood rim without noticing too much of an intersection, but if there a noticeable step, then the wheel is not correct in detail. The thumb groove is also a more subtle and gentle concave radius on the original wheel, though this won’t be too obvious unless the wheels are side by side. Turning to the reverse side of the wheel, the finger notches are one of the biggest indicators of a poorly finished reproduction wheel, being sharper edged instead of the sweeping blends between the concave and convex profiles, its easy to spot, but even easier to feel when holding the wheel, feeling harsh and un-finished and lacking that smoothness and normal refinement one would expect of a correctly made Jaguar item. Moving onto the metal work finishing, the holes on the original wheels had evenly formed radius’s over the holes and were nicely blended. Of course it is quite easy to improve a repro wheel in this respect, but if the edges of these holes do appear less than beautifully finished, then it is a sure sign that you are not looking at a genuine or correctly made Jaguar E type steering wheel. For us there are many more details relating to the wood type and construction which tell the wheels apart on closer examination, but I will leave this subject here now because I’ve probably dwelt on it too much already.

Coventry Timber Bending Co Ltd
Swallow Road, Holbrook Lane, Coventry later of Bodminfroad, Walsgrave, Coventry. Manufacturers of laminated and solid wood work for cars and boats. Manufactured wood rim steering wheels for Jaguar, MG and Austin Healey.
1938 Established. Directors: H E Newsum & L G Hains
1954 Produced 100 D-Type Jaguar steering wheel's
1961 Produced 7,500 E-Type Jaguar steering wheel's
1984 Insolvent and wound up

The 100% original one on my car:
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Here is an original un-restored example in need of work:
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And after sympathetic restoration which highlights the veneers:
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From late 1962 the cars had the grooved West African Golden Mahogany steering wheel part #C20267 which continued through 4.2 production and the only change was the satin finished spokes of the S2 models. They are all the same colour (rather pale for Mahogany and notwithstanding the grain structure and visible ray flakes, only a little darker in colour than beech, however, some of the wood presents with a darker hue as one might more typically associate with the name of the species) making for a much cheaper but uniform product. All the wood rim E-Type steering wheels are 16" diameter. Because the rims are cut from solid pieces of mahogany with no laminations it lacks the strength of its older sister and this is where the reputation of the E-Type flexing wheel comes from. Contrary to popular perception these were not made OEM by Moto-Lita - I have yet to find out who actually made them for Jaguar. The leather bound S3 steering wheels were OEM by Springall.
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A replacement steering wheel cost $112.30 in 1968. In June 1975 Jaguar announced the wood rim steering wheel #C28590 was no longer available and the leather rim steering wheel of the S3 was all that was available.

Exact reproductions of the CBT Co. steering wheel are now available from: http://jacobengineering.co.uk/index.php ... -wheels-2/
Last edited by Heuer on Mon Nov 30, 2015 5:20 pm, edited 22 times in total.
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#34

Post by Heuer » Thu Nov 07, 2013 2:57 pm

Car Radio's

Jaguar offered a 'Car Radio Assembly' as an optional extra. There were three versions - LW/MW, MW/SW and MW only:
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By looking at the kit list you will see there was a head unit, amplifier unit, two loudspeakers, brackets, covers, aerial, wiring and no less than four suppression condensers (the standard Champion WC548 plug caps were not resistive) so not a simple push-in fit as most people imagine. The radio's were supplied by Radiomobile (a merger of S. Smith & Sons and The Gramaphone Company aka His Masters Voice). The radio's could either be badged His Masters Voice, Smiths or Radiomobile and the fascia/knobs varied depending on what was required by the car manufacturer. Radio's appear to have been fitted by Dealer's with Jaguar providing an assembly kit:
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I have searched through Factory photos and I cannot see any cars with a radio fitted (the aerials are the give away, always fitted on the drivers side) which pints to Dealer fitment.

Radiomobile 500T head unit (L/W & M/W) badged 'His Master's Voice':

Country: Great Britain
Manufacturer/Brand: Radiomobile Ltd., Cricklewood Works, London aka S.Smith and Sons
Model: 500T - Radiomobile Ltd
Year: 1961
Type: Car Radio
Valves: 4: 12AC6 12AD6 12AC6 12AE6
Semiconductors : 2: OC82 OC26
Principle: Super-Heterodyne ZF/IF 470 kHz
Tuned circuits: 7 AM circuit(s)
Wave bands: Broadcast (MW) and Long Wave
Material: Metal case
Shape: Chassis only or for "building in"
Power type and voltage: Storage Battery 12 Volt
Loudspeaker: Permanent Magnet Dynamic (PDyn) Loudspeaker (moving coil)
Notes: Push button permeability tuning. Transistor OC82 provides AF amplification. Valves operate with 12 volt HT. A separate audio power amplifier unit is required with this model. A choice of 4 amplifier units were available A (OC26 2.5W), B (2x OC26 push-pull 5W), K (as A but separate heat sink) & L (as B but separate heat sink).
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And this is the amplifier unit:
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Radiomobile 230R head unit (M/W & S/W):

Country: Great Britain
Manufacturer/Brand: Radiomobile Ltd., Cricklewood Works, London alternative name S.Smith and Sons
Model: 230R
Year: 1957
Type: Car Radio
Valves 4: 6BA6 6BE6 6BA6 6AT6
Principle: Super-Heterodyne with RF-stage; ZF/IF 470 kHz; 1 AF stage(s)
Tuned circuits: 7 AM circuit(s)
Wave bands: Broadcast (MW) plus more than 2 Short Wave bands.
Power type and voltage: Powered by external power supply or a main unit 6, 12 & 200 Volt
Loudspeaker: For headphones or amp
Notes: Control unit of 2 part car radio. Requires separate Amp/PSU unit, type RA or RC, using 6AQ5 & 6X4 valves. Radio bands MW plus 8 SW bands 90m, 60m, 49m, 41m, 31m, 25m, 19m, & 16m

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Beautiful dial for short wave:
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And the associated 'RB' amplifier unit:
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Radiomobile 502T (M/W only):

Country: Great Britain
Manufacturer/Brand: Radiomobile Ltd., Cricklewood Works, London aka S.Smith and Sons
Model: 502T
Year: 1961
Type: Car Radio
Valves: 4: 12AC6 12AD6 12AC6 12AE6
Semiconductors: 1
Principle: Super-Heterodyne; ZF/IF 470 kHz
Tuned circuits: 7 AM circuit(s)
Wave bands: Broadcast only (MW).
Power type and voltage: Storage Battery for all 12 Volt
Material: Metal case
Notes: Push button permeability tuning. Transistor OC82 provides AF amplification. Valves operate with 12 volt HT. A reversible plug facilitates for either + or - earth. A separate audio power amplifier unit is required with this model. A choice of 4 amplifier units were available A (OC26 2.5W), B (2x OC26 push-pull 5W), K (as A but separate heat sink) & L (as B but separate heat sink).

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Amplifier unit for this radio would have been one of the above pictured 98200 units.

Interestingly the Radiomobile 502T was the only one specified for +ve or -ve earth. They are all based on valve (tube) technology and produce a wonderful natural sound. Any other radios must be considered 'after market' and 'dealer fit' falls into that category despite some clever badge labelling of Motorola products for the US market :roll:

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In early 1964 the radio panel assembly was changed to incorporate a new ashtray and from then on only one speaker was offered as part of the radio installation assembly:
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The aerial on the E-Type was typically fitted to the scuttle near the drivers door. There is a hole in the inner strengthening panel to accommodate it. View of the bulkhead showing internal hole for aerial shaft (LHD in this case):
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This 1964 Radio Handbook details what suppression was required in cars of the period and includes specific instructions for the E-Type: https://www.dropbox.com/s/n3ytimxvxr3w8 ... k.pdf?dl=1

Radio interference suppression was also a legal requirement:

60.1(1) Save as provided in paragraph (2), every wheeled motor vehicle first used on or after 1st April 1974 which is propelled by a spark ignition engine shall comply at the time of its first use with Community Directive 72/245 or ECE Regulation 10 or 10.01 or, in the case of an agricultural motor vehicle, Community Directive 75/322.1"

This was based on earlier UK regulations for RF suppression - small island, densely packed made it a real problem here. You can read (if you are really bored and with nothing else to do) Community Directive 72/245 here: http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/ ... 32004L0104

There was a vast range of after-market radio's in period and you can find a wide collection of them here: http://forum/etypeuk.com/viewtopic.php?t=1375
Last edited by Heuer on Wed Jan 06, 2016 1:24 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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#35

Post by Heuer » Sun Nov 10, 2013 1:02 pm

Wire Wheels

All E-Type's had painted stoved enamel wire wheels as standard - 5" x 15" - made by Dunlop Rim and Wheel Co. of Foleshill, Coventry and cost Jaguar £14/9/7 for the set of five. Chromium plated wire wheels were "supplied to special order only".

Coventry Rim and Wheel Co
of Alma St, Coventry
1898 Bought the Maxim Cycle Manufacturing Co
1912 Dunlop acquired the Coventry Rim and Wheel Co.; moved to Foleshill, Coventry
1913 Dunlop Rim and Wheel Co. name first appeared
1914 - 1918 Produced wheels for military vehicles and aeroplanes
1919 produced wheels and other components for various types of vehicles
1962 Made Hydrolastic suspension units for Morris 1100 to a specification from Moulton Developments Ltd
1963 Motor Show exhibitor. Wheels and other components

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The wheels were double laced having both long and short spokes. They had what has been called in retrospect, 'curly' hubs to distinguish them from the "easy clean" flat hubs of the S2 cars:
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The standard wire wheels for the E-type were Dunlop XA455C, part number #C14766. They are 5" by 15" and painted "Stoved Aluminum":
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The wheel has 72 spokes, of two different lengths. The 24 long spokes are 5.688" part number #7784. The 48 short spokes are 4.688" part number #7790. The 72 nipples are .75" long and 7 gauge. Part number #C5604. The spokes are .185" in diameter, swelling to .210" one inch from the flared end:
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The inner face of the wheel rim is stamped 'XA455C':
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Elsewhere it is stamped 'KX15':
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The tube stem hole is .625" in diameter and fitted with a plastic ferrule. The inner dimension of the ferrule is .5", accommodating stems which typically have a diameter of .45" The ferrule prevents chafing of the steel rim against the stem, and helps to keep water from seeping in between the tube and rim. If racing tubes with metal threaded stems are fitted, the ferrule is simply removed:
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The rim band is Dunlop part number #C197. It shows the band size, "WELL BASE RIMS", and "MADE IN GREAT BRITAIN":
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The "curly hub" adds torsional rigidity to the wheel but makes removing the short spokes more difficult:
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It is worth noting the modern reproductions are not identical, having a different shape to the curly hub and different gauge steel in the rim. Many have plated stainless nipples where the originals had no stainless steel whatever.

Tyres
The standard tyres were 6.40" x 15 Dunlop RS5 cross plies fitted with tubes which cost Jaguar £24/15/0 per set. White wall tyres (2 1/2" wide stripe) were "supplied to special order only" at an additional cost to the customer of £10/8/6 per set:
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Wheel Weights
The wheels were balanced using hammer on weights (not stick on!) on both inner and outer rim lips. The wheel weights used by Jaguar were a lead/antimony/tin mix, with a trace of arsenic for hardness, moulded around the steel retaining clip and painted silver. Six different weights were available in half ounce increments up to 3oz. The markings were part of the mould so raised up, not pressed in:
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'3' = weight in ounces
'D' in diamond = manufacturer Dunlop
'85G' = equivalent weight in grammes
Hg = contains mercury

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Valve Caps
Valve caps were nickel plated brass, embossed Schrader * and GT B for Great Britain:
Image
Image

Competition Wheels
For "racing" Jaguar specified triple laced 5.5" rear road wheels painted stoved aluminium (Metallichrome Aluminium - ICI: P0-2358) and these were additional to the standard equipment. i.e. you bought an extra pair of rear wheels. This wheel had three lengths of spoke for extra strength and were not available with chrome plating:
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Period photo of car at Brands Hatch with triple laced 5.5" racing wheels at the rear and standard 5" stoved aluminium on the front:
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Interestingly the S1 4.2 Spare Parts Catalogue does not list the rear racing only wheel combination.

Note: Personal viewpoint - I think the stoved aluminium wheels look best on cars with solid colours, chrome wire wheels look best on the Opalescent cars.
Last edited by Heuer on Fri Jun 10, 2016 10:56 am, edited 26 times in total.
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#36

Post by Heuer » Wed Nov 13, 2013 2:01 pm

Plenum Wing Nuts

Part #C12734 Wing nut securing air intake box to base. The one on the right is a generic UNF wing nut which tends to be the type usually seen on restored cars. The one on the left is the much larger cast item, cadmium plated brass, originally fitted. Notice the steep rake of the wings and how broad they are.
Image
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The originals are still available from Hutson's, SNGB and others (make sure you are not fobbed off with the small versions) but are not cheap at £7 each compared to the wimpy steel ones at £1. On the car the difference is even more noticeable:
Image

Special Washer C17544

A special washer C17544 was used under the nuts.
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It is a 'repair' washer (also known as a mudguard, fender or penny washer) as against a 'plain' washer and having a particularly large outside diameter to provide a greater area for distributing the load; useful in securing something a traditional nut and washer would pull through.
Outer diameter of 1" and 5/16" centre, 1/16" thick and originally cadmium plated.
Image

Historical note: Penny Washer - A flat washer with a particularly large outer diameter in proportion to its central hole. These are commonly used to spread the load on thin sheet metal, and are named after their use on automobile fenders. They can also be used to make a connection to a hole that has been enlarged by rust or wear. In the UK, the name originally comes from the size of the old British penny. In the UK, most industries refer to all large OD washers as penny washers, even when the OD is as much as twice the size of the old penny. An archaic form of this washer was sold as a "pot mender", usually in small quantities through a retail ironmonger. This included two washers, a nut and bolt and a sealing washer of rubber, cork or fibre sheet. They could be used for sealing small holes, rust spots or removed pipe connections in water tanks or large cooking vessels.

You can buy them here: http://www.racetorations.co.uk/fastener ... asher-p105

Most other suppliers only offer a metric size equivalent of 25mm x M8 x 1.65mm unless you shop around. They were used on all S1 and S2 cars regardless of plenum style.
Last edited by Heuer on Wed Jul 02, 2014 4:27 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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#37

Post by Heuer » Wed Nov 13, 2013 6:03 pm

Part #C17435 Fixing strap for 5 way connector block #3571 on screen wiper cable. Missing on many cars for some reason (probably because it is a bugger to get on):
Image
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#38

Post by 1954Etype » Wed Nov 13, 2013 7:05 pm

David, I have seen lots of cars with this bracket missing but the 2 self tappers were in place and painted body colour. I concluded that they ran out of brackets, fitted the screws to block the holes in the bulkhead and secured the connector block to the wiper motor using a length of cable strapping.
Angus 67 FHC 1E33656

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#39

Post by Heuer » Thu Nov 14, 2013 2:01 pm

Marston Excelsior Radiator

ALL 3.8's were fitted with Marston Excelsior aluminium core radiators by the factory up until the end of production. The radiator and header tank, also made by Marston, cost Jaguar £8/17/7. Some people have suggested they were only fitted to the early 1961 cars while others say they were replaced in 1963 by a brass version. According to Anders Clausager of Jaguar Heritage in his book 'Factory Original Jaguar E-Type' "It is speculated that later 3.8 cars may have had a copper (brass) radiator as did the 4.2 model but it has not proved possible to verify this." According to George Camp JCNA concours judge "Jaguar did issue a replacement unit in brass (#C25070) to replace the aluminium Marston unit (#C16770) at some time in the 1960s. I checked the J12 books (Jaguar Master Parts Catalog issued annually) and found it to still be a service item in 1970 but the first mention of it is in the 1965 J12 catalog. If a Dealer wanted a replacement Marston radiator they ordered the #C16770 which superseded to a #C25070 (brass but configured for the 3.8 car)." The 1964 red OTS at the beginning of this thread has a Marston Excelsior aluminium radiator and as 4.2 production began in August of that year it was one of the last built which confirms what Anders said. The 1963 FHC also has the Marston radiator as do these:

This is #890870, one of the very last 3.8's to roll off the production line in August 1964:
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This is #881735. August 1964:
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This is #890574, May 1964
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This #881640, 6th May 1964:
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This is #881373, April 1964:
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This is #896424, April 1964:
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This #890236, April 1964:
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These Jaguar documents support the case:
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Some history:

1919 - Excelsior Motor Radiator Co of Leeds was incorporated.
1920 G. Kynoch and Co, part of Nobel Industries acquired a holding in Excelsior Motor Radiator Co Ltd of Leeds (aircraft radiators).
1926 Formation of ICI; became part of the ICI Metals Division
1937 Manufacturers of radiators, oil coolers, petrol, oil and water tanks.
1943 - The radiator business of John Marston Ltd, part of ICI Metals Division, was merged with another ICI subsidiary Excelsior Motor Radiator Co Ltd. of Leeds to become Marston Excelsior
WWII - Manufactured parts for the De Havilland Mosquito and metal fuel tanks for Wellington Bombers and other aircraft
WWII - Pioneered development of flexible non-metallic fuel tanks, and self-sealing covers through collaboration between ICI experts in dyestuffs, leathercloth, metals, paint and plastics.
1961 - Designers, fabricators and sheet metal workers in aluminium and cuprous alloys, uranium, zirconium, tantalum, reinforced plastics and synthetic rubbers. Heat transfer specialists. Products include heat exchangers, pressure vessels, pipework, bursting discs, special purpose machines, industrial fans, flexible tanks for aircraft and bulk storage and transport of liquids.
1969 - Became part of IMI Group
1989 - DENSO acquired the manufacturing facility to become DENSO Marston Ltd.
2007 - DENSO Marston Ltd exit car market to focus on manufacturing thermal cooling systems for construction, industrial and agricultural applications

It has always intrigued me why Sir William Lyons chose a Leeds based company to supply his radiators as he always seemed to favour local companies (Coventry Radiator and Presswork Ltd of Canley, Coventry were the largest radiator manufacturer in the country) until someone pointed out his first job after his apprenticeship was as salesman for Sunbeam, and John Marston owned the Sunbeam cycle, motorcycle and car company!

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The Marston Excelsior radiator fitted to the E-Type had a bare aluminium core and finned side tanks painted black. It is this feature which gives the radiator its distinctive appearance that is synonymous with the 3.8 engine bay.
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Each radiator was fitted with a name plate on the top surface bearing its serial number. It was held in place by four screws: round head slot screw with a head dia. of 0.150". Screw OAL 0.250", threaded length 0.175" & the thread dia. 0.083".
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Coolcat Corp sell an excellent reproduction Marston nameplate:
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Despite their wonderful heritage the Marston Excelsior radiators fitted to the E-Type were not that good and contributed to the car's reputation for overheating. For the 4.2 a brass core radiator of more conventional construction was used. You should regard the original Marston radiator as a museum piece and it would be unwise to run your car with one fitted especially in modern traffic conditions. Also, because of the construction, they cannot be re-built so the alternative is to use a modern 4.2 style radiator adapted to the 3.8 cooling system or buy one of the reproductions from Radtec, Fosseway or CoolCat Corp. These use milled aluminium side tanks to replicate the Marston fins and retain the bare aluminium core to give the car its unique 3.8 look from the front (4.2 radiators are painted all black):
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The replicas are very expensive (£1,300) but work superbly and their high efficiency allows the original fan and motor to be retained. I have the Radtec version, which is used also by E-Type UK, and it finishes off the look of the car perfectly. Fosseway make an even more accurate copy.
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This is the Jaguar issued #C25070 brass radiator which appeared in the parts bulletin in 1965 as a replacement for the Marston:
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Marston header tank:
Image
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Last edited by Heuer on Mon Nov 30, 2015 5:25 pm, edited 21 times in total.
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#40

Post by Heuer » Fri Nov 15, 2013 11:56 am

Part number BD23142 "Striker plate on Wheel arches, receiving sliding catches" were fitted from chassis #886093/860581 onwards (riveted on not screwed in).
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The earlier cars from the start of FHC production used this version (screwed in not riveted):
Image
It was replaced by the one with the rubber buffer because the catches and hinged luggage extension rattled when in the upright position. Interestingly the drawing in the Spare Parts Catalogue clearly shows the early version but it references BD23142 i.e the rubber buffer version:
Image

The early style catch receivers are not available. You could try Richard Smith to see if he has NOS if you need them. You will also notice the early cars had a metal extension to the wing, covered in vinyl, to act as a stop. Again the parts catalogue shows a picture of the early wheel arch panel assembly with the extension but references the later one with no extension:
Image
Last edited by Heuer on Sun Nov 17, 2013 3:51 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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